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Library Copyright Alliance releases fourth guide to Google Books proposed settlement following judge’s decision

Posted by Lisa Strand
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on Wednesday, April 13, 2011 in Federal Legislation
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WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Library Copyright Alliance (LCA) announces the release of “A Guide for the Perplexed Part IV: The Rejection of the Google Books Settlement,” an analysis of the latest decision in the Google Books Search case and its potential effect on libraries. The LCA is comprised of the American Library Association (ALA), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).This Guide is the latest in a series prepared by LCA legal counsel Jonathan Band to help inform the library community about this landmark legal dispute. In the Guide Part IV, Band explains why the Court rejected the proposed class action settlement, which would have allowed Google to engage in a wide variety of activities using scanned books.As stated in the Guide, “The court concluded that the settlement was unfair because a substantial number of class members [i.e., authors and publishers] voiced...

WLA 2009: Canoe the Open Content Rapids

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on Thursday, October 22, 2009 in WLA Blog Archive
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Canoe the Open Content RapidsDorothea Salo, UW System Digital Content Group http://www.slideshare.net/cavlec/canoe-the-open-content-rapids [under Creative Commons Attribution license] InstructionDigital storytelling - copyright issues over pulling from files found on Google Images - sets a bad example Scholarship reasons to provide copyright education, provide proper information sources Different from country to country Instructors tend to violate copyright, as well as avoid activities that are probably fine CopyrightLimited monopoly over original works that are fixed in a tangible medium (includes stuff on Internet) It's in the Constitution - not about making money, about promoting "progress of science and the useful arts" Life of author + 70 years; 95 years corporate entities OK to copy for scholarship, parody/satire, library preservation, classroom use; limited copying for other reasons = "fair use" You can: a) sell in whole/part, b) give it away for free, c) license it for free/paymentFaculty generally fall into (b) without realizing it -...