Information Literacy Award Winners

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2016/2017

Kim Olson-Kopp, Annie Baumann, and Vickie Holtz-Wodzak

WAALphoto

Congratulations to the winners of the 2017 WAAL Information Literacy Award. The 14th annual award goes out to team members from the Todd Wehr Library and English department at Viterbo University in La Crosse Wisconsin. The recipients are Kim Olson-Kopp, Annie Baumann, and Vickie Holtz-Wodzak.

Their project titled, ‘The Un-Research Project: Turning the Research Process Upside Down,” involves significant collaboration between the library and campus partners and significantly challenges the traditional research project. The team first sought out and gained IRB approval for investigating the effectiveness of this new approach. Where students often end up “satisficing” and using the bare minimum of sources to complete their research, our winners are applying Allison Hosier’s “un-research” approach to flip the research process while taking into account the new ACRL Framework.

For the ‘Un-Research Project,’ students first draft a paper without doing any research, then they investigate over the course of the semester with their peers and librarians the claims, half-truths, gaps, assertions and potential misinformation contained therein.

This project also stood out by its assessment of student work at multiple stages, including the comparison of learning products between two English Composition courses. Our winners plan to further expand their research in-order to compare the learning outcomes from the Un-Research project with more traditional projects, utilizing their university’s VALUE rubrics for written communication.

 

2015/2016

Miguel Ruiz, Eliot Finkelstein, Trisha Prosise, Sheila Stoeckel

In 2015, University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries, in collaboration with DoIT Academic Technology, completely redesigned CLUE. CLUE was a web-based tutorial that had long been a required element of the blended informational literacy module integrated into courses that fulfill the General Education Communication A (Comm A) requirement.

Sift & Winnow: Libraries@UW, a modern online learning tutorial was developed in its place. The six module tutorial provides a highly interactive online learning experience for students with direct assessment measures.

Using the new Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy as the foundation, and Backward Design as the instructional model for development, the Sift & Winnow tutorial features learning modules that are interactive, engaging, flexible, modular, accessible, and assessable.

The two most appealing aspects of this program are its accessibility for the learner and the educator. The program describes how the module is composed of several different types of learning objects to accommodate different learning styles, which empowers learners of all types through this blended learning model. The analytics for assessment are also appealing for gauging student learning and instructional assessment which could potentially lead to more cross-campus collaboration.

2014/2015

Amanda Howell, Ellen Latorraca, Diana Shull, and Martha Stephenson

InfoLit Award_2015 

The 12th annual award goes out to a team of reference and instruction librarians from the Andersen Library at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. The recipients are Amanda Howell, Ellen Latorraca, Diana Shull, and Martha Stephenson.

Their ambitious project, entitled “Flipping Out for Information Literacy,” involved collaborating with outside departments to plan, develop and create tutorial modules with a goal of strengthening students’ information literacy skills. A flipped classroom is utilized to deliver the content, and students’ skills are assessed along the way.

The sixteen modules are centered on the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards and focus on nine lower-level or seven upper-level skill sets. Each module can stand alone, but the modules can build upon each other, reinforcing important skills that range from analyzing the anatomy of a scholarly article, to building background knowledge, to managing references. Modules consist of a variety of video, text, or interactive activities which support concept or skill development and are delivered via the campus online learning system. All incorporate pre- and/or post-assessments.

Flipping key information literacy concepts has proven to be a beneficial way to practice often-neglected hands-on activities when students visit the library. Because students complete the modules outside of class, this allows librarians precious time to develop instructional content to reinforce higher-level skills.

This project was also distinguished by originality in the use of Case Scenario/Critical Reader Builder (CSCR), close collaboration with key educators, and effective assessment tools.

 

2013/2014

UW-Eau Claire, Cross-Departmental Team

InfoLit Award_2014

A team of librarians and professors from the University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire (UW-EC) are the 2014 WAAL Information Literacy Award recipients. This cross-departmental team includes Eric Jennings, Instruction and Outreach Librarian; Hans Kishel, Research and Instruction Librarian; Bryan S. Vogh, Head of Library Systems; Angie Stombaugh, Associate Professor, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning Director; Arin VanWormer, Assistant Professor of Nursing; and Rita Sperstad, Assistant Professor of Nursing.

Their program, “Scaffolding Student Learning in Nursing,” is the eleventh annual award winner.  It was selected due to its innovative use of lesson study in higher education, its extensive collaboration with educators, and its comprehensive, long-term assessment process.

The program was developed after librarians and nursing educators at UW-EC noticed current library instruction did not provide nursing students with an understanding of how to effectively retrieve, evaluate, and use information, all evidence-based practice skills needed by nurses in the workforce. The team set up a lesson study group, a learner-focused system in which instructors plan, observe, and analyze actual classroom lessons. Information literacy goals were implemented progressively across the nursing curriculum into four courses. The longitudinal study started in the Winter of 2011 and will conclude at the end of the Spring 2014 semester. Team members recently published an article in Nurse Educator (July/August 2013) about the lesson study project.

This program embodies a truly novel approach to providing nursing students with quality information literacy instruction.  By scaffolding the progression of research skills within the nursing curriculum, prioritizing student learning, and providing opportunities to reflect upon, revise, and improve teaching methods through the use of lesson study, it serves as a shining example of how collaborative information literacy projects can help students obtain the information literacy skills they need to succeed as professionals and life-long learners.  

2012/2013

Kate L. Ganski and Theresa Beaulieu

InfoLit Award 2013

Kate L. Ganski and Theresa Beaulieu of the UWM Libraries at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee are the 2013 winners of the WAAL Information Literacy Award.  Kate L. Ganski is the Library Instruction Coordinator and Theresa Beaulieu is the Education and Outreach Librarian.

Their program “Reworking Your Curriculum to Increase Student Engagement" was chosen as the tenth annual award winner in recognition of  innovative contributions to advance information literacy through the use of assessment and evaluation methods to introduce scholarly research, professional literature, and documentation tools early in the students’ undergraduate career.

Too much content and lack of student engagement in library orientations were the driving factors behind the major revision of library instruction curriculum for a college success skills class at UW-Milwaukee.  The instruction redesign began with the identification of the course learning outcomes.  Instruction outcomes and content were then aligned with class assignments. Learning objects were developed and integrated into the library sessions.  All worksheets were replaced with virtual handouts.  Student engagement increased through peer teaching activities, task-driven activities, and authentic in-session assessments.  

The instructional project was innovative in several areas including its backward design approach to developing curriculum, presentation of multimedia learning objects, and responsive context-sensitive assessment.

2011/2012

Gretel Stock-Kupperman and Kim Olson-Kopp

Gretel Stock-Kupperman and Kim Olson-Kopp of Todd Wehr Memorial Library at Viterbo University are the 2012 winners of the WAAL Information Literacy Award.  Gretel Stock-Kupperman is the Library Director and Kim Olson-Kopp is the Assistant Director and Reference & Instruction Librarian.

Their program “Comparing Student Learning Outcomes between Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Course and Integrated Information Literacy Instruction in English" was chosen as the ninth annual award winner due to its strong level of innovation in course development, in-depth assessment activities, and excellent teaching and learning components.

Information literacy is a fundamental component of the college’s core curriculum and is a basic skill attained by the traditional student within their first two years at Viterbo University.  To ensure that transfer students also meet the skill requirement, the Viterbo librarians developed and taught an instruction course designed to bridge the information literacy gap. They then developed a comprehensive evaluation program to compare information literacy learning outcomes between the traditional students and transfer students.

The instructional project was innovative in several areas:  the development of a manageable instruction curriculum directly aligned with professional standards that addresses the needs of a constituent group common to all academic institutional, transfer student;  the application of a full set of assessment activities including a control group, common assignment, and direct assessment of student work;  and finally, the design of a process to compare two different modes of instruction, a credit class to embedded instruction, in order to determine what is most effective for the target student population.

2010/2011

Rita Mitchell and Beth Bretl

The WAAL Information Literacy Committee is very pleased to announce the team of Rita Mitchell and Beth Bretl of Cardinal Stritch University as the 2011 winners of the WAAL Information Literacy Award.  Rita is the Information Literacy Librarian and Beth is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of English.  Their program "Librarian and Faculty Partnerships: Embedding Librarians in English Courses to Improve Information Literacy Skills and Writing Skills" was chosen as the eighth annual award winner due to its strong levels of collaboration, well-defined outcomes, and high adaptability to other institutions and contexts.

Their pilot program paired a librarian with a faculty member to assist students in English 102, a core writing and research course.  Rita and Beth collaborated in a fully online English 102 course.  Rita was embedded in the course via the learning management system. Library instruction was delivered using video conferencing software, live chat, handouts and discussion forums. The intended outcome of the partnership was to develop student-librarian relationships outside of the library and improve students' writing and information literacy skills.  Assessment of the partnership was conducted through both student and faculty surveys.

Please look for their presentation at the 2011 WAAL Conference in Stevens Point.

2009/2010

Paloma Celis Carbajal, Steven Baumgart, Nola Walker, and Tony Krier of Memorial Library were awarded the 2010 Information Literacy Award.  They were honored for integrating information literacy instruction in the Spanish curriculum through plug-in assignments, with online and in-person components.  In Fall 2009, the UW-Madison Spanish Department redesigned its curriculum for Spanish 226, “Intermediate Language Practice with Emphasis on Writing and Grammar,” and invited the library to participate in the process.  The program involved the library developing a series of plug-in assignments designed to expose students to the Spanish language collection in ways that would integrate with students’ composition assignments and require minimal work for teaching assistants.  The library provided online content through a Library Course Page as well as a 15-minute face-to-face instruction session to all 29 sections of the course. 

2008/2009

Susan Heffron and Amelia Osterud received the award in 2009.  Susan Heffron has been the Instructional Services Librarian at Carroll University since 2004, when she completed her MLIS from UW-Milwaukee. She attended the ACRL Information Literacy Immersion Program in 2005 and is responsible for designing and implementing the information literacy portion of the First Year Seminar program at Carroll. Amelia Osterud has been the Access Services Librarian at Carroll University since 2006. She finished the joint MLIS/MA program at UW-Milwaukee in 2004. She is a member of the WILIUG steering committee, and oversees the web site and ILS for Carroll Library. Both Susan and Amelia presented, "Avoiding the “Librarian Nerd Loop--Engaging Students and Creating a User-Friendly Library Environment" at WAAL in 2008.  They are being honored for their work incorporating information literacy into Carroll University's First Year Seminar program.

2007/2008

Dave Dettman received the award in Spring 2008.  Dave, Coordinator of Information Literacy and Outreach at UW-Green Bay, made significant contributions to information literacy, both locally and state-wide. A member of the WAAL Information Literacy Committee since 2003, Dave presented programs and posters at WLA and WAAL conferences in addition to maintaining the committee's web site.  In 2008, Dave was honored for making strides in integrating information literacy across the freshman curriculum and for developing and assessing different models of information literacy delivery to introductory courses. These opportunities arose from his significant role in the iSkills competency tests administered at UW-Green Bay, the results of which demonstrate that students who had received library instruction scored higher than those in the control group. He shared his findings with the WAAL 2008 presentation, "Approaches to Integrating Information Literacy Instruction into the Curriculum: Delivery Methods and Methods of Assessment."

2006/2007

No award given.

2005/2006

The 2005/06 third annual Information Literacy Award was presented to members of the Marquette University Raynor Memorial Libraries Instruction team: Valerie Beech, Rosemary Del Toro, Julie O’Keeffe and Rose Trupiano! The focus of this year’s award was on a project that promotes information literacy, and theMarquetteUniversityteam hit the mark with their innovative "Assessment Rubric Project: Partnering with Faculty and University Administrators in Support of Student Learning." The project involved the development of assessment rubrics to be used by faculty across campus in evaluating student research. Embedded into the rubric are information literacy criteria. What impressed the award committee about this project was its innovative approach to incorporating the ideals of information literacy into the curriculum throughout the campus. The library responded to a demonstrated need on its campus, and exhibited creativity, practicality and ingenuity in addressing a campus mandate in this manner. The project involved collaboration across campus, including the endorsement of administration.

2004/2005

Abigail Loomis was the 2005 winner of the second annual WAAL Information Literacy Award. Abbie has a long tenure of service in library instruction and a deep commitment to the advancement of information literacy, not only on the UW-Madison campus, but also on a state and national level. Through her work on the WAAL Information Literacy committee from 1997-2001, Abbie helped plan and sponsor many programs covering different aspects of instruction. She also participated in developing the committee’s Best Practices which promote an exchange of instructional practices and ideas with librarians throughout the state. Abbie Loomis was also actively involved in writing the proposal to bring ACRL’s Immersion Program to Wisconsin and helped organize the 2001 Wisconsin Immersion Program that was held at Edgewood College that year. Abbie played a key role in helping to make information literacy a required component of the UW-Madison undergraduate curriculum via the CLUE online tutorial. CLUE and the library instruction classes are campus-wide endeavors that reach more than 4,000 students annually.

2003/2004

Cristine Prucha, UW-La Crosse Information Literacy Librarian was the recipient of the first annual WAAL Information Literacy Award.Prucha's skills in collaborating with faculty to create problem-based learning assignments for sections of a freshman year seminar at UW-La Crosse and her work on developing "Recommendations Regarding the Integration of Information Literacy into the General Education Curriculum" for the La Crosse campus have garnered praise from the campus community. The problem-based learning instruction led students to look at complex issues from a variety of perspectives and sometimes challenged them to support viewpoints that were not necessarily their own.

  

Congratulations to the winners of the 2017 WAAL Information Literacy Award. The 14th annual award goes out to team members from the Todd Wehr Library and English department at Viterbo University in La Crosse Wisconsin. The recipients are Kim Olson-Kopp, Annie Baumann, and Vickie Holtz-Wodzak. 

 

Their project titled, ‘The Un-Research Project: Turning the Research Process Upside Down,” involves significant collaboration between the library and campus partners and significantly challenges the traditional research project.  The team first sought out and gained IRB approval for investigating the effectiveness of this new approach. Where students often end up “satisficing” and using the bare minimum of sources to complete their research, our winners are applying Allison Hosier’s “un-research” approach to flip the research process while taking into account the new ACRL Framework.

 

For the ‘Un-Research Project,’ students first draft a paper without doing any research, then they investigate over the course of the semester with their peers and librarians the claims, half-truths, gaps, assertions and potential misinformation contained therein.

 

This project also stood out by its assessment of student work at multiple stages, including the comparison of learning products between two English Composition courses. Our winners plan to further expand their research in-order to compare the learning outcomes from the Un-Research project with more traditional projects, utilizing their university’s VALUE rubrics for written communication.