Programs

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Tuesday, April 26

2:00 - 5:00 PM

WAAL Planning Committee Meeting and Preparation


5:00 - 7:00 PM

Registration


5:00 - 7:00 PM

Committee Dinner


7:00 - 8:30 PM

WAAL Board Meeting


9:00 PM -

Chair's Reception

 

Tuesday|Wednesday|Thursday|Friday

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Wednesday, April 27

7:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Registration


8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Internet Cafe


7:30 - 8:45 AM

Breakfast


9:00 - 10:15 AM

Keeping Up with the Joneses: Improving Information Literacy for Nontraditional Students

Salon C-D

Anna Zook, UW-Eau Claire, McIntyre Library

The nontraditional student population, students age 24 and older, has been growing incrementally over the past twenty years at four-year institutions. The current economic climate has prompted many adults to return to school due to financial hardship, wishing to better their job positions, to seek new career paths, or to better their skills for their current employers. The multitude of obligations these students have outside of school can leave them pressed for time when faced with last minute reference questions or confronted with larger research needs in the middle of the semester. Their struggles with time management often leave them stressed, feeling exasperated, anxious, and apprehensive about their ability to keep up with traditional students on campus. Although many four-year colleges provide orientation sessions for incoming nontraditional students, many of these students are unable to attend these sessions and find themselves struggling mid-semester to use the library’s resources and tools necessary for their academic success. The adult learner’s desire to be more self-sufficient library users provided the impetus for a study conducted throughout the spring and fall semesters of 2010 on the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire campus. Nontraditional students were surveyed and interviewed about their library skills and comfort level when using McIntyre Library.

This presentation will report on the findings of this study, conducted in partial requirement of a Master’s of Library and Information Science through the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Information Studies. Suggestions will be presented for reaching out to the nontraditional student population and encouraging a more active library environment that will appeal to this group of students.


Student Workers: How We Motivate Them

Salon E

Regina Pauly, UW-Platteville
Lori Wedig, UW-Platteville

From our experiences of running a curriculum library, and inter-library loan and the periodicals floor, we will share how to motivate students and present some of the procedures we use to keep them up-to-date. Examples will include manuals, student appreciation days, sponsoring contests, presenting awards, and one-on-one training.


Strange Bedfellows: Unconventional Partnerships to Accomplish Campus Learning Objectives

Salon F

Sheila Stoeckel, UW-Madison Libraries
Adrianna Guram, UW-Madison, Center for the First-Year Experience
Ian Benton, UW-Madison, College Library

Libraries are increasingly playing a larger role in multiple aspects of teaching and learning on college campuses. Increased student learning objectives related to information literacy and other research processes have created a pathway for libraries to become more active participants in enhancing student outcomes. Other academic support units also have new opportunities available to them to become involved in the process.  As a result new innovative collaborations have an opportunity to grow.
This presentation will demonstrate how libraries can leverage these partnerships to make a bigger impact not just by taking advantage of each unit’s area of expertise, but by also exploring additional innovative ways to use that expertise to collaborate on new programs and professional opportunities for each group.

The UW-Madison Libraries’ partnership with the Center for the First-Year Experience (CFYE) will serve as a model for this process. Three years ago the two units came together to collaborate in a conventional way: the CFYE providing a first-year seminar and the libraries providing traditional information literacy instruction for it. However, over the past few years both units have explored ways to innovate within this partnership by continuously improving the library module for students, developing a graded research assignment, and also including several librarians as the primary lead instructors for the course. Furthermore, increased opportunities for collaborations between the two units for other large initiatives on campus grew from this effort helping to advance the mission of both organizations. 

During this presentation attendees and presenters will:

Discuss strategies to align library programs with the cultures of teaching and learning on your campus. 

Strategize how libraries can still embrace their values, but also focus on partnerships to enhance relationships and allow for increased opportunities for application.

Brainstorm new potential partnerships on your campus.


10:15 - 10:45 AM

Break

 

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM (noon)

M. Cragin, photo

Keynote: Melissa Cragin

Growing the Curation Community in LIS: Current Research and Educational Initiatives

Digital curation has emerged as an important area for Library and Information Science research, and is of particular interest for academic and research libraries. There are now a number of service models emerging, as we assume increasing responsibility for the curation and stewardship of research data across our institutions. Curation of research data involves a range of problems that will need to be better understood; and, while it is clear that libraries cannot address or solve these problems alone, our work will have an impact: How we shape our collective data infrastructures will shape how data assets contribute to science. This talk will address current research in the field of data curation and the development of education programs to meet these challenges.

 

12:00 PM (noon) - 2:00 PM

Luncheon Speaker: Justin Isherwood

Somewhere between the Pen and the Plough

Some reflections on why the writing life matters--even to a farmer.

 

2:00 - 3:15 PM

Accessibility of Online Library Resources for People with Disabilities. An Update on Research, Policy and Initiatives

Salon C-D

Axel Schmetzke, UW-Stevens Point

Even though online resources are now well established in higher education, the online infrastructure in most libraries continues, unnecessarily, to exclude certain users, particularly those with print-related disabilities, from enjoying full and equal access. After providing an update on legal and policy-related dimensions of this issue, the presenter will focus on the latest empirical research findings, including, among others, the current accessibility data concerning university library websites within the UW system, as well as nationwide.

The presentation will conclude with a discussion of ALA’s Task Force on Equitable Access to Electronic Content and ways for individual librarians to support the move towards an all-inclusive online environment.


K-12 Information Literacy Education in the State of Wisconsin: A Survey and Discussion

Salon E

Raina Bloom, UW-Milwaukee, School of Information Studies

Wisconsin’s Model Academic Standards for Information and Technology Literacy has not been updated since its release in 1998. Though the individual standards themselves are still considered useful, many of the benchmarks are now out-of-date and unhelpful to K-12 educators. As such, using the state standards in conjunction with other, more recent tools and with an awareness of what is possible and needed in their communities, school librarians and educators around the state have devised standards for their districts.

This proposed session will provide background information on K-12 information literacy education in the state of Wisconsin, including information about the standards favored by the state’s school librarians. The results of a survey concerning local approaches to information literacy education will be shared.

The presenters will lead a discussion concerning the implications for higher education and how librarians and information professionals in the state’s colleges and universities might work to support and further the work done by their colleagues in primary and secondary education.


Marketing the Academic Library: Expanding Your Role on Campus and Increasing Your Profit Margin

Salon F

Ron Edwards, Western Technical College

Budgets are coming under closer scrutiny, competition among departments on campus has become more intense, operating costs have escalated, and funding from federal and state sources has drastically been reduced. The end result has been for more accountability from administrators, state lawmakers and boards, and the need to create a stronger identity to justify continued existence and spending. So what have these new demands and approaches got to do with marketing the academic library? Everything!  As key players on campus, academic librarians and administrators have sometimes not taken full advantage of how libraries and staff contribute to the teaching and learning process, recruitment and retention of students, socialization process of the campus community, and research requirements of faculty, students, and staff. A reexamination of how the academic library is perceived is the answer. 

My presentation will address why the academic library’s role on campus needs to be enhanced and what is required to re-energize its position as a pivotal part of the overall educational process, as well as how profit margins can be increased. Specifically, I will examine how to develop a comprehensive marketing plan based on assessing customer needs. My focus will be on creating a marketing agenda, developing a list of marketing benefits, identifying key personnel in your organization who will lead these efforts and act as change agents, and communicating your library’s identity to library users and beyond. Finally, I will clarify who your real customers are and how to attract more, discuss general public relations tactics, and how to develop your own niche on campus.


3:15 - 3:45 PM

Break

 

3:45 - 5:00 PM

Uncommon Solution to Creating an Information Commons

Salon C-D

Louise Diodato, Cardinal Stritch University Library
David Weinberg-Kinsey, Cardinal Stritch University Library

Cardinal Stritch University Library received funding and support from the University to remodel the Library first floor into an Information Commons. The Library was determined to maintain services during the remodel, which began the last week of the Spring 2010 semester. While increasing the computers and group study area, the Library lost 300 shelves for books. This presentation will describe the following aspects: the planning process for the remodel including Library staff input, selection of furniture, organization of the space, service point moves, Contractor collaboration, Instructional Technology collaboration, collection moves and stack moves; and the method for moving most of the books in the Main Collection once.


Instructional Support for Digital Media Assignments: An Emerging Role for Libraries

Salon E

Sarah McDaniel, UW-Madison Libraries
Sheila Stoeckel, UW-Madison Libraries
Carrie Nelson, UW-Madison, College Library

Students are increasingly being asked to demonstrate their learning through the creation of multimedia learning objects in formats such as short videos or podcasts. Many libraries support these digital media assignments with innovative classrooms, well-equipped labs, and equipment for checkout. Frequently, instructors experimenting with these types of assignments are also asking for specialized instructional services such as copyright training for their students. A one-year grant program is providing instruction librarians at UW-Madison with new opportunities to develop support for digital media assignments.  Librarians and instructional technologists are collaborating with twenty instructor awardees to develop, evaluate, and disseminate best practices for digital media assignments. Throughout the grant year, librarians are creating instructional materials, training and consulting with faculty, participating in course support teams, and working with students. 

At the presentation, you will learn about the trends in digital media assignments and the resources and support UW-Madison librarians are piloting in the areas of research, citation, and copyright. Early examples of courses and assignments will illustrate these efforts. We’ll also discuss what’s working well, how the work will be assessed, and plans to continue this work after the grant year. Come share your ideas about how libraries should participate in support for digital media assignments and how librarians can continue to develop and promote their expertise in this important area.


The DMCA and Intellectual Freedom at Institutions of Higher Education

Salon F

Wyatt Ditzler, UW-Milwaukee, School of Information Studies

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 dramatically changed some aspects of copyright law in the United States. Of particular importance is the use of the so called DMCA “takedown notices” by copyright holders to stop alleged online copyright infringement. This presentation will discuss the current practice(s) of institutions of higher education when DMCA takedown notices are received, explore the threat to intellectual freedom related to the notices, and consider who is best suited to educate an institution’s faculty and students about copyright law. To avoid liability in copyright infringement cases, institutions must act upon a DMCA takedown notice ‘expeditiously’. This means that institutions assume that the file(s) being made available, or being transferred across the institution’s network, are infringing upon a copyright. Potentially any file, an e-reserve, documents from web-based course software like Desire2Learn, PDFs of the latest journal article, or student downloads of music and/or movie files being transferred in or out of the institution’s network could be flagged as infringing by the copyright holder. The potential threat is that copyright holders only see the files being transferred not whether the transfer is legal within copyright law or if the person has permission to transfer the file. The confluence of the DMCA of 1998 and the default position institutions of higher education take, can have a “chilling effect” on the intellectual freedom at an academic institution,  stifling speech and criticism, and ignoring the American ideal of innocent until proven guilty based solely on allegations of copyright infringement.

Education of the university community about copyright law and a change in practices is needed to restore the balance between intellectual freedom and the rights of the copyright holder and to ensure that the “fair use” rights of  users of copyrighted resources are not pushed aside.


7:00 - 8:00 PM

Speed Networking
New Member Round Table

Rebecca Buchmann, Black Creek Village Library

Salon C-D

Are you new to librarianship? Or just want to cultivate and renew relationships with your peers? Join us for a fast-paced, fun-filled session where you can meet librarians from across the state and find colleagues who share your interests. Have one-on-one conversations with your peers for 5 minutes at a time, but when the timer dings, it’s time to move on.

 

An Introduction to Tai Chi Easy (or) Renew, Energize, Sustain – the Librarian

Salon E

Colleen Angel, UW-Stevens Point

Renew, energize, sustain. These words describe the goals of the practice of Tai Chi Easy. TCE offers four essential self-care methods for creating and sustaining optimal health: movement, massage, meditation, and breathing. Tai Chi Easy encompasses all of these in easy to do and easy to learn form. The average person can learn some nice-sized chunks of Tai Chi Easy in a short time. And the beginning movements of Tai Chi Easy can be practiced by people of varied fitness levels as the beginning moves can be done sitting in a chair.

While it is not possible to learn everything about Tai Chi Easy in one session, useful elements of the practice can be learned in minutes and practiced nearly anywhere people go.

If you care about health, renewing, energizing, and sustaining yourself, you may want to attend this session. 

 

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Thursday. April 28

7:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Registration


8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Internet Cafe


7:30 - 8:45 AM

Breakfast and WAAL Business Meeting

 

9:00 - 10:15 AM

Circulating iPads in an Academic Library Setting

Salon C-D

Jessica Hutchings, SOIS, UW-Milwaukee
Jodi Bennett, Cardinal Stritch University Library

As new eReaders such as the iPad, Kindle, and even smartphones continue to become more and more popular, librarians must ask themselves what role they will play in responding to the rapidly growing demand for this type of media and consider the implications of a coexistence between print and digital books in the library. This session will explore a pilot project recently undertaken by Cardinal Stritch University who currently circulating iPads in their academic library. 

Come find out how they got started, the step-by-step process of putting this sort of electronic device into circulation, and the patron response. Questions that will be addressed include:
What user needs might eReaders support in an academic library setting? 
How does sharing an eBook reader intended for one person affect student research? 
What new experiences are available for those who primarily read and conduct research via print materials? 
Can eReaders help library users learn about emerging technologies? 
How do we maintain our traditional roles in the library while embracing new technology?


Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Data Curation at the Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation

Salon E

Andrew Johnson, UW-Madison, School of Library and Information Studies and Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation

UW–Madison's Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation (LOCI) is a biophotonics instrumentation laboratory working to develop advanced optical and computational techniques for imaging and experimentally manipulating living specimens.  Research at LOCI includes projects in bioimage informatics--an interdisciplinary field with the goal of improving the description, management, analysis, preservation, and sharing of biological image data. Recently, LOCI has included students from the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) in bioimage informatics collaborations with computer scientists, engineers, and biologists in order to develop efficient and effective methods for image data curation.

In this presentation, I will describe the data curation projects I am currently involved with at LOCI and how this work fits into the context of other efforts taking place in the wider bioimage informatics community. I will also discuss my role in an ongoing collaboration with the UW Forward project that seeks to provide greater access to biological image data via the new UW system-wide resource discovery application. 

Throughout the presentation, I will explore lessons I have learned as a SLIS student embedded in a biological imaging laboratory, including the necessary skills, areas of opportunity, and potential barriers for LIS students and professionals interested in engaging in similar scientific data curation projects.


Is it CRAP? Using a Memorable Acronym to Teach Critical Website Evaluation Skills

Salon F

Cynthia Bachuber, Globe University-Madison
Lisa Muccigrosso, Globe University-Madison

In this session, the presenters will demonstrate how they have successfully created a lesson plan to teach college students about researching wisely on the web by using the acronym CRAP (Currency, Reliability, Authority, Purpose). The session will lead the audience through library instruction aimed at undergraduates that introduces the need for critical evaluation when using the internet for research and teaches a set of effective evaluation skills. Participants will see the lesson plan demonstrated live by a few volunteers acting as students. Students are asked to find a website on a topic of their choice to use in a school project, and are then asked to describe why they believe the site of their choosing is “good.” The instructor introduces the CRAP criteria for evaluation and discusses the meaning of each word in the acronym. Then, all students search Google using the same keywords. The class is split in two with each section evaluating a different link from the Google results using CRAP criteria. The students will then present their website to the rest of the class, discuss how it fared in the CRAP evaluation, and decide whether it’s appropriate for a school project. 

After the demonstration, the presenters will discuss the pedagogy behind the session and invite the audience to discuss this and other methods of teaching website evaluation.


10:15 - 10:45 PM

Break


10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Instruction Potluck: Share, Design and Create New Materials for Your Classroom

Salon C-D

Laura Schmidli, UW-Madison, Steenbock Memorial and College Libraries
Lia Vellardita, UW-Madison, Wendt Commons

As relatively new librarians, we have experimented with many different media and approaches for supplementing and supporting classroom instruction.  While we don’t consider ourselves the authority on instructional materials, we would like to share our experiences and ideas with other instruction librarians. In this program we plan to demonstrate various techniques and tools we find useful in reaching students in and beyond the classroom, including: Jing, PowerPoint with iSpring, Prezi, online polls, e-worksheets, Moodle and more.

Come prepared with your own tools and solutions, instructional materials and questions.  Be prepared to share your experience!


Adventures in Assessment

Salon E

Jean Zanoni, Marquette University Libraries

Marquette University Libraries recently re-focused and reinvigorated its assessment efforts by developing an assessment plan, educating staff on assessment basics, and engaging in assessment activities. Activities have included administering the LibQUAL Lite survey to assess user satisfaction with collections, services, access, and space and ClimateQUAL Organizational Climate and Diversity Assessment for staff, conducting usability testing of the Libraries’ newly redesigned website, developing an interactive feedback site, submitting library-related questions for the University’s senior survey, and providing staff training sessions. Ultimately, the Libraries will operate within a culture of assessment and employ data-driven decision-making at all levels. 

The session will feature an introduction to library assessment, highlight Marquette Libraries’ experience and provide information about other library assessment efforts in the state. 


IT Interested? Encouraging IT Experimentation in the Library

Salon F

Thomas Durkin, UW-Madison, Social Science Reference Library
Ian Benton, UW-Madison, College Library
Jim Jonas, UW-Madison, MERIT Library

Come join UW-Madison librarians to learn about a fun way to encourage library staff experimentation and interest in new technology. Beginning in 2006, library staff at UW-Madison started meeting over lunch to discuss interesting new technology developments. The meetings consist of very informal and low-key show-and-tell sessions aimed at encouraging an experimentalist and enthusiastic attitude toward new technology among non-tech library staff. We have focused primarily on “popular computing” topics such as social networking, “web 2.0,” wireless devices, smart phones,  desktop hardware/software, and sites and other channels of new information.

After a brief discussion of the principals of the group, our WAAL session will focus on creating an “IT Interest Group” session at WAAL. Please come with your digital camera, Android, iPhone, Blackberry, new NetBook/Laptop or iPad, and be ready to show off! Come ready to describe a new app or widget that you have created or plan to create! Come ready to discuss an efficiency application you use and like, or new desktop hardware/software that you have recently experimented with and believe has promise! We hope to see you there.


12:00 PM (noon) - 2:00 PM

Luncheon Speaker: Jim Oliva

Trivia in Stevens Point: The Grip of a Contest

The luncheon program will feature a discussion of the writing, organization, execution and playing of the World's Largest Trivia Contest in Stevens Point, Wisconsin.


2:00 - 3:15 PM

Information Literacy Award Winner:
Librarian and Faculty Partnerships: Embedding Librarians in English Courses to Improve Information Literacy Skills and Writing Skills

Salon C-D

Rita Mitchell, Cardinal Stritch University Library
Beth Bretl, Cardinal Stritch University, English Department

This presentation will explain the pilot program implemented at Cardinal Stritch University to pair a librarian with a faculty member to assist students in English 102, a core writing and research course. Faculty and librarian participation was voluntary. Because the class was taught by six different instructors, in face-to-face and online formats, the librarians and faculty were given flexibility in what was covered and how the librarian was involved in the course.

The presenters, Rita Mitchell, Information Literacy Librarian, and Beth Bretl, Adjunct Faculty of the English Department, collaborated in a fully online English 102 course. The presenters will explain what techniques were used to deliver content to the students, relate what information literacy skills were addressed, and provide examples from the online course. The presenters will share successes, challenges and potential improvements in the collaboration. The intended outcome of the partnership was to develop student-librarian relationships outside of the library and improve students’ writing and information literacy skills. Assessment of the partnership was conducted through a student survey and a faculty survey. Results from the overall project assessment and the individual online course will be shared.


Try It, You’ll Like It!—Searching the “Cereal” Set (U.S. Serial Set Digital Collection)

Salon E

Nancy Mulhern, Wisconsin Historical Society Library

In summer of 2010, most of the UW system libraries gained access to the Lexis Nexis Digital Serial Set Collection. But what is the Serial Set and when should you refer students to the database? This session will cover the basics of search techniques and the types of information found in this database. The Serial Set, which begins in 1789, covers every aspect of American life and history. It includes reports and documents produced or ordered by Congress, presidential communications and treaty materials.  Topics covered range from farming, westward expansion, and science, to politics, exploration, business, and more.


Age Management Medicine for Your Book Collection: Can You Rejuvenate Interest in Older Books by Adding Table of Contents?

Salon F

John Jax, UW-La Crosse, Murphy Library
William Doering, UW-La Crosse, Murphy Library

Library catalogs designed more than a decade ago no longer offer users enough book searching power. This statement is especially true when compared to Google Books or Amazon’s “LOOK INSIDE” robust searching and full-text viewing features. However, many academic libraries lack funds to purchase or upgrade their library systems. One seemingly low cost alternative would be to improve information about the book that is contained in the library catalog. This is commonly achieved by adding or enriching catalog records with table of content information. By 2003, Murphy Library recognized the need for enrichment and a project to revitalize the monographic book collection was initiated. The limited studies regarding table of content augmentation in library catalogs in the past have focused on increasing the circulation of small collections in highly specialized library collections, such as medical libraries. Murphy Library’s study differed in several important ways: 1). We wanted to study TOC enhancement from an academic library perspective, 2). We wanted to find out if adding TOC information would result in the circulation of previously non-circulating items in a medium sized academic library (with a control group), and 3) Did adding TOC have a negative or positive impact on system-wide borrowing through improved searching? The non-circulating items, for the sake of this study, were purchased from the date range of three to seven years ago.

The presenters will share their institution’s experiments, experiences, and innovations with attendees. We expect this session will generate a lively discussion about the effectiveness of adding information, such as tables of contents to a library catalog and we hope to hear feedback about our approach to this problem.


3:30 - 5:00 PM

Poster Session Reception

 

7:00 PM -

New Member Roundtable Social
Tilted Kilt Restaurant

New to the library profession? (Or experienced?) New to WLA? Looking to meet new friends in the library world? If you answered yes to any of these questions, join us for the NMRT Social! A fun and informal meeting session where you can meet new people, connect with people in similar positions from across the state, and make friends with people you will be seeing at conferences for years to come!

 

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Friday, April 29

7:30 - 10:00 AM

Registration


8:00 - 11:00 AM

Internet Cafe


7:30 - 8:45 AM

Breakfast

 

9:00 - 10:15 AM

Keynote: Char Booth

C. Booth, photo

Instructional Literacy and the Library Educator: Design, Technology, and Academic Culture

Whether or not "instruction" appears in our job titles, librarians in the academy increasingly find ourselves in the position of teaching our users, colleagues, and peers. At a time of massive transition in the academy, the pedagogical mission of libraries must be explored at a collective and individual level and integrated more meaningfully into the disciplinary structure of our institutions. MLIS training largely omits pedagogy and instructional design, creating widespread demand for viable instructor development strategies.

Char Booth, an avid library education and technology advocate, introduces the Instructional Literacy framework, a series of concepts she has identified to empower librarians to become stronger and more culturally aware designers and educators.

 


10:15 - 10:45 AM

Break

 

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Weeding in Context of the UW System

Salon C-D

Janice Bogstad, UW-Eau Claire, McIntyre Library

Several steps are taken in managing monographic weeding at an academic library, especially when consortia arrangements are in place. This presentation will focus on specific examples from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire McIntyre Library where librarians have just wrapped up a massive 5+ year weeding project. To date, the weeding efforts have been focused on large-scale collection reductions, and statistics on selected reduction-rates will be presented. In order to manage such exhaustive weeding projects a simple process flow chart was developed that can be adapted to any collection or project. Discussion will start on the background of the weeding projects at UW-Eau Claire, most of which were in response to space needs and disciplinary research methods. Work flows that were developed to manage such an exhaustive project will be shared and these can be adapted depending on the parameters of the library and how collections are conceptualized; factors to consider before starting any project include the depth and breadth of library collections, the library’s collection development policies and collection development levels, items deemed to be core or seminal works, consortia arrangements in place or in the works, and space issues and concerns. In addition standard operational factors in workflow will be discussed as part of a six step process. 

Also, the follow-up project, organized to deal with actual condition of items in the stacks, which has just begin, will be outlined.


Where Everybody Knows Your Name: Building Successful User Relationships with CRM Software

Salon E

Ryan Schryver, UW-Madison, Wendt Commons
Caroline Meikle, UW-Madison, Department of Soil Science

Why do our users keep coming back? Online databases, ebooks, and Google seem to provide information better/faster/easier than a trip to the library. Even so, users continue to ask for our help. The reason is service. Librarians provide the intuition and know-how that no database or search tool has achieved. But sometimes the service we offer results in frustration and confusion. Those instances often come out of a failing to understand users’ past relationships with our colleagues, or not having ready access to a record of users’ historical needs. Real “service” – the result of long-term relationship building -- comes out of knowing users’ histories, and letting their past show you the best way to help them with their present and future needs. Customer relationship management (CRM) software solves the history problem by giving library staff a real-time platform to document users’ interactions in one place. With CRM, libraries can keep a record of emails, meetings, conversations, and follow-up tasks related to any user, providing library staff with an invaluable relationship development tool, one that can pinpoint users’ needs with precision.

Our presentation will compare CRM packages offered today, their data sharing and reporting components, and their potential use in library settings. We will also examine Wendt Commons Library’s 2-year CRM program, looking at its successes and near-misses.


Why Librarians (but not only Librarians) Should Staff Our Reference Desks

Salon F

Steve Frye, UW-Madison, College Library

As library administrators wrestle with how to staff our libraries during a time of decreasing budgets and fewer in-person reference questions, many have considered eliminating their reference desk or staffing their reference service point(s) with students and paraprofessionals.  

Come hear the perspective of a reference coordinator at a library where professionals staff the reference desk from 8am until 12midnight and why professionals (and directors) need to spend more hours staffing our reference desks and not less. 

During the presentation, I’ll review the literature concerning reference service staffing and reflect on why reference traffic is increasing in some libraries and decreasing in others.  Along the way I'll touch on the need for late night librarians, telecommuting, and the critical need for librarians who specialize in being generalists. 

 

1:30 - 3:00 PM

Nature Walk, Green Circle Trail

Join John Jury, Stevens Point local, on a nature walk on the Green Circle trail. It will be a slow-paced mile walk with a brief stop at the Wisconsin Conservation Hall of Fame. The trail walk begins directly behind the hotel conference center.  

For more information, go tohttp://www.greencircletrail.org/

 

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Annual Conference of the Wisconsin Association of Academic Librarians, April 26 - 29, 2011, Ramada, Stevens Point
TheWisconsin Association of Academic Librariansis a Division of theWisconsin Library Association,ACRL Chapter.

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Questions or comments regarding these pages can be directed toKaren Dunn.