HUGO Awards

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The Hugo Award is given annually by the World Science Fiction society. Society members may be fans or professional writers in the field, but the Hugo is considered a fan award. Awards are voted on by the members of the current world science fiction convention. Members need not attend the convention to receive ballots. The Hugo is named for Hugo Gernsback, editor of the first science fiction magazine. Awards are given for works published in the previous year.

Banks, Iain. THE ALGEBRAIST. Night Shade Books. 2004.

The hero has the job of communicating with the inhabitants of a local gas giant, who live life at a much slower pace than we humans do. They may ( or may not) be the guardians of an ancient mystery, which explains why a crazed religious warlord is about to enter their solar system. Critics call it a fun space opera.

Clarke, Susanna. JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR. NORRELL. Bloomsbury, 2004. WINNER!

Magic returns to England in the early 19th century and helps to win the Napoleonic Wars. The difficult relationship between the two protagonists ( Strange and Norrell , a sort of a wizardly Gilbert and Sullivan), and between them and the realm of faery, is portrayed in a beautiful pastiche of 19th century literary style, complete with remarkable footnotes. Per critics, long but engrossing.

McDonald, Ian. RIVER OF GODS. Simon and Schuster. 2004.

In 2047, a hundred years after Independence, India is burdened with ecological troubles and accelerated technology. The cast of characters includes a comedian who inherits a business empire, a journalist, a policeman hunting rogue AI's, an American scientist, a politician, a neuter, a small-time crook, a Big Dumb Object, and India itself. Per critics, it's dazzling.

Mieville, China. IRON COUNCIL. Ballantine. 2004.

Set in the fantasy city of New Crobuzon, this is a place filled with talk of revolution and the legacy of socialism from many years ago. It contains variegated humans and near humans, unusual love affairs, extraordinary landscapes and nods
to many historical revolutionary movements. Per critics, fantastical.

Stross, Charles. IRON SUNRISE. Ace. 2004

The "Iron Sunrise" is an artificially ( possibly accidentally) triggered supernova that wipes out an entire solar system. This story features neo-Nazis in space, tough teenage girl protagonist, brilliant prose, and rapid plot twists. Space opera plus spy story.

 

2006 HUGO NOMINATIONS

MacLeod, Ken. LEARNING THE WORLD: A SCIENTIFIC ROMANCE. Tor. 2005.

The ancient starship is entering orbit around a promising new system after a 400-year journey. However, the human passengers detect unexpected, curious electromagnetic emissions from the system's earth-like world. The planet is already occupied by batlike aliens, and now war is about to break out between two of the alien nations. Should they interfere? Per critics, this is contemporary sf at its best, with some weighty philosophical issues to be considered.

Martin, George R.R. A FEAST FOR CROWS ( A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE #4). Bantam. 2005.

This fourth installment of the Martin saga continues the bloody drama of the war-torn Seven Kingdoms and the battle for the Iron Throne. With the king dead and a child on the throne, the Queen Regent must protect her son from his enemies vying for control of the realm. A popular, grandiose fantasy epic.

Scalzi, John. OLD MAN'S WAR. Tor. 2005.

Earth must defend its claims to new planets against alien races. To this end, the government has created the Colonial Defense Force ( aka Old Farts), an army of senior citizens who have given up their lives and even their old bodies to fight aliens. In return, they get the secret of reverse aging. Seventy-five year old John Perry thinks it's a good deal, until he sees a ghost. Per critics, compelling sf thriller and an endearing love story.

Stross, Charles. ACCELERANDO. Ace. 2005.

Manfred Macx. a 21st century intelligence amplification entrepreneur, lives much of his life in the virtual world of artificial intelligence and molecular nanotechnology. His young daughter Amber indentures herself, via a computer program, to a mining company on Jupiter. There, she discovers a byproduct of the Singularity, the emergence of computronium, microscopic AI's who convert all extraneous mass into copies of themselves. Decades later, Sirhan, the son of an alternate Amber, also becomes aware of the great danger that may destroy the solar system. Per critics, a high-tech adventure, filled with complex concepts. Hard to read.

Wilson, Robert Charles. SPIN. Tor. 2006.

As ten-year-old Tyler Dupree sits in the back yard of his Washington D.C. home, the stars go out. A barrier now encloses the Earth, generated by huge artifacts hovering over the poles. Even weirder, time passes 100 million times more swiftly outside the barrier, so the sun may only last 40 years. However, a visitor from a newly terraformed Mars has an idea, to seed the ice-filled Kuiper Belt with slow-growing, living machines capable of investigating the so-called "Hypotheticals." Per critics, a far-fetched but fascinating time-odyssey .


2005 NEBULA NOMINATIONS AND WINNER

The Nebula awards are given annually by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America) Membership is restricted to professional science fiction writers in either print or media. Awards are given for the best novel published during the previous year.

Bujold, Lois McMaster. PALADIN OF SOULS. HarperCollins. 2003. WINNER!

Cured of the madness that made her a prisoner in the castle of her family, the Lady Ista dy Baocia, Dowager Royina of Chalion, finds herself at loose ends. Bereft of husband, son, and parents, she decides to undertake a pilgrimage of atonement. But it soon becomes a dangerous quest to stop a supernatural threat from shattering the peace of Chalion. Sequel to Curse of Chalion. Popular series.

Doctorow, Cory. DOWN AND OUT IN THE MAGIC KINGDOM. Tor. 2003.

A young man barely 100 years old, Jules is working at his dream job, running the Haunted Mansion ride at Disney World, when he is killed for the fourth time. With the help of two friends, Jules fights the impending coup, but struggles more with his relationships in an era when people routinely store their memories to avoid boredom or unpleasantness. Per critics, a fun breezy read though there are hints of darker world.

McDevitt, Jack. OMEGA. Ace. 2003.

The discovery of the omega cloud phenomenon --cloudlike waves of energy that destroy entire civilizations - has put Earth on alert. When the cloud heading toward Earth veers toward a planet populated by a primitive alien species, a few concerned individuals travel to that world to save it. And they also find a way to save their own planet. Per critics, gripping adventure, hard science, and engaging characters.

Mitchell, David. CLOUD ATLAS. Random House. 2004.

This virtuosic novel has 6 narratives in an array of genres. There is a naïve clerk on a 19th century voyage to Polynesia; an aspiring composer who insinuates himself into the home of a syphilitic genius; a journalist investigating a nuclear power plant; a publisher with a best seller on his hands; and cloned human beings created for slave labor. Their stories are arranged around the oral history of a post-apocalyptic island, Hawaii. Per critics, a dazzling entertaining, challenging puzzle.

Stewart, Sean. PERFECT CIRCLE. Small Beer. 2004.

Ghosts are like homeless people, we are told by our hero, DK "Dead" Kennedy. But seeing ghosts complicates life, because, at night, the ghosts look just like the living, and he's wrecked cars trying to avoid them. Moreover, are these ghosts going to threaten his life with his family? And then a cousin wants DK to exorcise the ghost of a girl he murdered! Critics called this poignant, hilarious, and sometimes creepy, but always compelling.

Wolfe, Gene. KNIGHT. Tor. 2004.

A young boy crosses from the modern into the fantasy world of Mythgarthr, where he finds himself in the body of an adult and receives the name "Abel of the High Heart." As he quests for the sword that will make him a knight, he encounters both monstrous and human enemies, discovers romance, and learns about love and honor. Wolfe is considered an elegant stylist and literary philosopher. First of a 2-volume saga. Critics called this a masterpiece and compelling fantasy.

 

2006 NEBULA NOMINATIONS

Clarke, Susanna. JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR. NORRELL. Bloomsbury. 2004.

Magic returns to England in the early 19th century and helps England win the Napoleonic Wars. The difficult relationship between the two protagonists ( Strange and Norrell, a sort of wizardly Gilbert and Sullivan), and between them and the realm of faery, is portrayed in a beautiful pastiche of 19th century literary style, complete with remarkable footnotes. Per critics, long but engrossing.

Haldeman, Joe. CAMOUFLAGE. Ace. 2004.

A million years before the emergence of humans, an alien emerges from a spacecraft that's crashed in the Pacific Ocean. Over many millennia, the alien has evolved from fish to man. Now the Navy has found another mysterious artifact seven miles underwater in the Tonga-Kermodec Trench. Government scientist Russell Sutton tries to examine the object, but his efforts attract the attention of the original alien and another alien. And Sutton senses they are there! Per critics, nonstop action and a panoramic view of history.

McDevitt, Jack. POLARIS. Ace. 2004

During a sightseeing trip to a distant star on the Polaris, all the passengers (brilliant scientists) disappear without a trace. Sixty years later, antiques dealer Alex Benedict and his partner Chase Kolpath want to purchase artifacts from the Polaris. But they also begin to investigate the whereabouts of the missing passengers. However, some unknown pursuers are on their tail. Per critics, high adrenaline plot and a complex meditation on some thorny ethical dilemmas.

Pratchett, Terry. GOING POSTAL. HarperCollins. 2004.

Con man Moist von Lipwig is sentenced to be hanged, but this is, of course, Discworld. So he is mysteriously revived, and Lord Vetinari tells him he is now responsible for the defunct Ankh-Morpork postal system, which has been taken over by the internet "clacks" who work for the Grand Trunk Co. Moist tries to escape, but he is forced to deal with "the voices of unsent letters" and a corporate conspiracy. Fortunately, a vampire, a secret society of unemployed postal workers, and crafty Mr. Tiddles, a cat, are there to help. Per critics, sharp, satirical humor.

Ryman, Greg. AIR. St. Martin's. 2004.

It's 2020 in Karzistan, a primitive, chaotic Central Asian city. One day, its citizens, along with the rest of the world, are subjected to a test of hyper advanced technology that brings internal communication directly into their minds. But some people die, and intelligent, but illiterate Chung Mae, now shares her mind with a dying woman from another time. But Chung soon realizes she now knows a lot about the future and the past. So she tries to help the villagers by negotiating between them and the government. Per critics, intensely political and full of sharp commentary and vivid characters

Wright, John C. ORPHANS OF CHAOS. Tor. 2005.

Five orphans being raised in a very strict British boarding school discover that they may not be human. Amelia seems able to travel in the fourth dimension. Victor is a synthetic being who can control the molecular arrangement of matter. Vanity finds secret passages in walls. Colin is a psychic. Quentin is a warlock. Where have these "orphans" come from - from a laboratory or from some pagan god? Why are they here? Per critics, a sophisticated fantasy with an erotic charge and a fascinating, complex myth-infused series.



The James Tiptree, Jr. Award

The James Tiptree, Jr. Awards, voted and presented by the, Tiptree Award Council, for science fiction
or fantasy that explores and expands the roles of women and men. The award is named for Alice B.
Sheldon, who wrote under the pseudonym James Tiptree, Jr. The name Tiptree was selected to illustrate
the difficulty women have in gaining recognition and credibility for their art.

2005
Ryman, Geoff. AIR:OR, HAVE NOT HAVE.

2004 (Co-winners)
Haldeman, Joe. CAMOUFLAGE
Sinisalo, Johanna. NOT BEFORE SUNDOWN ( Troll: a Love Story)

2003
Ruff, Matt. SET THIS HOUSE IN ORDER: A ROMANCE OF SOULS

2002 (Co-winners)
Harrison, M. John. LIGHT
Kessel, John. "Stories for Men"

2001
Goto, Hiromi. THE KAPPA CHILD

2000
Gloss, Molly. WILD LIFE

1999
Charnas, Suzy McKee. THE CONQUEROR'S CHILD

1998
Carter, Raphael. "Congenital Agenesis of Gender Ideation."

1997 ( Co-winners)
Candas, Jane Dorsey. BLACK WINE
Link, Kelly . "Travels with the Snow Queen."

1996 ( Co-winners)
LeGuin, Ursula. "Mountain Ways."
Russell, Mary Doria. THE SPARROW

1995 ( Co-winners)
Hand, Elizabeth. WAKING THE MOON
Roszak, Theodore. THE MEMOIRS OF ELIZABETH FRANKENSTEIN

1994 ( Co-winners)
LeGuin, Ursula. "The Matter of Seggri" in FLYING CUPS AND SAUCERS
Springer, Nancy. LARQUE ON THE WING

1993
Griffith, Nicola. AMMONITE

1992
McHugh, Maureen. F. CHINA MOUNTAIN ZHANG

1991 (Co-winners)
Arnason, Eleanor. A WOMAN OF THE IRON PEOPLE.
Jones, Gwyneth. WHITE QUEEN

RETROSPECTIVE WINNERS

Charnas, Suzy McKee. MOTHERLINES. WALK TO THE END OF THE WORLD.

LeGuin, Ursula. LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS

Russ, Joanna. "When It Changed" in AGAIN, DANGEROUS VISIONS

Russ, Joanna. "When It Changed" in THE FEMALE MAN

John W. Campbell Awards, 1973-2002
(by James E. Gunn)

The John W. Campbell Award for the best science-fiction novel of the year is one of the three major annual awards for science fiction. The first Campbell Award was presented at the Illinois Institute of
Technology in 1973. Since then the Award has been presented in various parts of the world: at California State University at Fullerton; at St. John's College, Oxford; at the World SF Writers Conference in
Dublin; in Stockholm; at the World SF meeting in Dublin again; and since 1979 at the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

The Award was created to honor the late editor of Astounding Science Fiction magazine, which is now named Analog. Campbell, who edited the magazine from 1937 until his death in 1971, is called, by many
writers and scholars, the father of modern science fiction. Writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss established the award in Campbell's name as a way of continuing his efforts to encourage writers to
produce their best possible work.


1973
1st Beyond Apollo, Barry N. Malzberg
2nd The Listeners, James Gunn
3rd Darkening Island (Fugue for a Darkening Plain), Christopher Priest
Special award for excellence in writing: Dying Inside, Robert Silverberg

1974
1st (tie) Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke; Malevil, Robert Merle
2nd (tie) The Embedding, Ian Watson; The Green Gene, Peter Dickinson
Special non-fiction award: The Cosmic Connection, Carl Sagan

1975
1st Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said, Philip K. Dick
2nd The Dispossessed, Ursula K. Le Guin
3rd None awarded

1976
1st The Year of the Quiet Sun, Wilson Tucker*
2nd The Stochastic Man, Robert Silverberg
3rd Orbitsville, Bob Shaw

*The committee felt that no truly outstanding original novel was published in 1975. 1st place,
therefore, was a "special retrospective award" made to a truly outstanding original novel that was
not adequately recognized in the year of its publication (1970).

1977
1st The Alteration, Kingsley Amis
2nd Man Plus, Frederik Pohl
3rd Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, Kate Wilhelm

1978
1st Gateway, Frederik Pohl
2nd Roadside Picnic, Arkady & Boris Strugatsky
3rd A Scanner Darkly, Philip K. Dick

1979
1st Gloriana, Michael Moorcock
2nd And Having Writ..., Donald Benson
3rd Altered States, Paddy Chayefski

1980
1st On Wings of Song, Thomas M. Disch
2nd Engine Summer, John Crowley
3rd The Unlimited Dream Company, J. G. Ballard

1981
1st Timescape, Gregory Benford
2nd The Dreaming Dragons, Damien Broderick
3rd The Shadow of the Torturer, Gene Wolfe

1982
1st Riddley Walker, Russell Hoban
2nd None awarded
3rd None awarded

1983
1st Helliconia Spring, Brian W. Aldiss
2nd No Enemy But Time, Michael Bishop
3rd None awarded

1984
1st The Citadel of the Autarch, Gene Wolfe
2nd The Birth of the People's Republic of the Antarctic, John Batchelor
3rd Tik-Tok, John Sladek

1985
1st The Years of the City, Frederik Pohl
2nd Green Eyes, Lucius Shepherd
3rd Neuromancer, William Gibson

1986
1st The Postman, David Brin
2nd Galapagos, Kurt Vonnegut
3rd (tie) Kiteworld, Keith Roberts; Blood Music, Greg Bear

1987
1st A Door into Ocean, Joan Slonczewski
2nd This Is the Way the World Ends, James Morrow
3rd Speaker for the Dead, Orson Scott Card

1988
1st Lincoln's Dreams, Connie Willis
2nd The Sea and Summer, George Turner
3rd The Unconquered Country, Geoff Ryman

1989
1st Islands in the Net, Bruce Sterling
2nd The Gold Coast, Kim Stanley Robinson
3rd Dragonsdawn, Anne McCaffrey

1990
1st The Child Garden, Geoff Ryman
2nd Farewell Horizontal, K. W. Jeter
3rd Good News from Outer Space, John Kessel

1991
1st Pacific Edge, Kim Stanley Robinson
2nd Queen of Angels, Greg Bear
3rd Only Begotten Daughter, James Morrow

1992
1st Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede, Bradley Denton
2nd The Difference Engine, William Gibson and Bruce Sterling
3rd (tie) A Woman of the Iron People, Eleanor Arnason; Stations of the Tide, Michael
Swanwick; The Silicon Man, Charles Platt

1993
1st Brother to Dragons, Charles Sheffield
2nd Sideshow, Sheri S. Tepper
3rd A Fire Upon the Deep, Vernor Vinge

1994
1st No award
2nd Beggars in Spain, Nancy Kress
3rd Moving Mars, Greg Bear

1995
1st Permutation City, Greg Egan
2nd Brittle Innings, Michael Bishop
3rd No award

1996
1st The Time Ships, Stephen Baxter
2nd The Diamond Age, Neal Stephenson
3rd Chaga, Ian McDonald

1997
1st Fairyland, Paul McAuley
2nd Blue Mars, Kim Stanley Robinson
3rd The Sparrow, Mary Doria Russell

1998
1st Forever Peace, Joe Haldeman
2nd Slant, Greg Bear
3rd Secret Passages, Paul Preuss

1999
1st Brute Orbits, George Zebrowski
2nd Starfarers, Poul Anderson
3rd Distraction, Bruce Sterling

2000
1st A Deepness in the Sky, Vernor Vinge
2nd Darwin's Radio, Greg Bear
3rd Greenhouse Summer, Norman Spinrad

2001
1st Genesis, Poul Anderson
2nd Ash: a Secret History, Mary Gentle
Calculating God, Robert Sawyer
Infinity Beach, Jack McDevitt
3rd Fresco, Sheri Tepper

2002
1st Chronoliths, Robert Charles Wilson
Terraforming Earth, Jack Williamson
2nd No second place
3rd Probability Sun, Nancy Kress

2003
NOMINATIONS
American Gods, Neil Gaiman
Pashazade, John Courtenay Grimwood
Bold as Love, Gwyneth Jones WINNER!
Secret of Life, Paul McAuley
Chasm City, Alastair Reynolds
Lust, Geoff Ryman

2004
1st Omega, Jack McDevitt
2nd Natural History, Justina Robson
3rd X President, Philip Baruth

2005 Finalists ( Winner not yet chosen)
Elizabeth Bear
Steph Swainston
K.J. Bishop
Chris Roberson
David Moles

LOOK FOR SF AWARD WINNERS ON GOOGLE.COM USING WORDS SUCH AS HUGO NOMINATIONS OR WINNERS, NEBULA NOMINATIONS OR WINNERS, JOHN W. CAMPBELL NOMINATIONS OR WINNERS, JAMES TIPTREE NOMINATIONS OR WINNERS. See also LOCUSMAG.COM.