Autograph Garden

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You'll hear these authors speak during the conference, but this is your chance to touch base on a personal level and have them sign a book.

Wednesday, October 21

Grand Ballroom

12:15 p.m.

♦ R. Bruce Allison

    If Trees Could Talk:  Stories about Wisconsin Trees

    Every Root is an Anchor:  Wisconsin's Famous and Historic Trees

 

2:00 p.m.

♦ Amy Cordova

    Namaste!

    Juan and the Jackalope

 

3:30 p.m.

♦ Jim Draeger

    Encore!  The Renaissance of Wisconsin Opera Houses

    Fill 'Er Up:  The Glory Days of Wisconsin Gas Stations

♦ David McGlynn

    The End of the Straight and Narrow:  Stories

 

5:30 p.m.

♦ Craig Pierce

    A Greyhound's Tale:  Running for Glory, Walking for Home

    A Labrador's Tale:  An Eye for Heroism

    A Labrador's Tale 2:  The Incredible Thank You Gift

    Sit, Stay, Work, Play, All Dogs have their Day

 

Thursday, October 22

Grand Ballroom

10:15 a.m.

♦ Jeffrey L. Russell

     Change Basics

♦ Terese Allen

     The Flavor of Wisconsin

     The Ovens of Brittany Cookbook

     CafWisconsin Cookbook

 

11:00 a.m.

♦ Lynda Barry

     What it Is

 

12:15 p.m.

♦ Kathleen Schmidt Kline

    People of the Sturgeon:  Wisconsin's Love Affair with an Ancient Fish

 

Friday, October 23

Salon C/D

2:00 p.m.

♦ Ben Merens

Committee

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committee

Waving our magic wands are (back row): Meg Shriver, Barb Kelly, Cheryl Kraft, Tasha Saecker, Joe Bongers, Geri Moeller, Melissa Kazmer; (front row): Carolyn Habeck, Colleen Rortvedt, Brigitte Rupp Vacha, Desiree Bongers, Mike Thomas, Elizabeth Timmins, Nicole Hardina-Wilhelm

Under the Invisibility Cloak:  Michael Nitz, Lynn Stainbrook, Julie Fricke, Gretchen Raab, Jason Shirley. 

 

Chair:
Barb Kelly

2645 Sunnyview Road

Appleton, WI 54914
(920) 915-6173

bkelly48@gmail.com


Autograph Garden:
Elizabeth Timmins

Muehl Public Library    

436 North Main Street

Seymour, WI  54165-1021    

(920) 833-2725

etimmins@mail.owls.lib.wi.us

Book Cart Drill Team:

Cheryl Kraft

Neenah Public Library

P.O. Box 569

Neenah, WI 54957-0569

(920) 886-6314

kraft@neenahlibrary.org

Booklet:

Melissa Kazmer

Neenah Public Library

P.O. Box 569

Neenah, WI 54957

(920) 886-6313

kazmer@neenahlibrary.org

Booklet Ads:
Lynn Stainbrook

Brown County Public Library

515 Pine Street

Green Bay, WI 54301

(920) 448-440

stainbrook_lm@co.brown.wi.us

Equipment:
Gerri Moeller

Outagamie Waupaca Library System

225 North Oneida Street

Appleton, WI 54911

(920) 832-3906

gmoeller@mail.owls.lib.wi.us

Exhibits:
Michael Nitz

Appleton Public Library

225 North Oneida Street

Appleton, WI 54911

(920) 832-6168

mnitz@apl.org

Exhibitors Representative:
Jason Shirley
Ingram Library Services
jason.shirley@ingrambook.com

Local Arrangements:
Meg Shriver

Appleton Public Library

225 North Onedia Street

Appleton, WI 54911

(920) 832-6176

mshriver@apl.org

Carolyn Habeck

Hortonville Public Library

102 West Main Street

Hortonville, WI 54944-9414

(920) 779-4279

chabeck@mail.owls.lib.wi.us

Partnerships:
Lynn Stainbrook

Brown County Public Library

515 Pine Street

Green Bay, WI 54301

(920) 448-440

stainbrook_lm@co.brown.wi.us

Programming:
Gretchen Raab

Neenah Public Library

P.O. Box 569

Neenah, WI 54957

(920) 886-6310

raab@neenahlibrary.org

Nicole Hardina-Wilhelm

Neenah Public Library

P.O. Box 569

Neenah, WI 54957-0569

(920) 886-6315

hardina-wilhelm@neenahlibrary.org

Colleen Rortvedt

Appleton Public Library

225 North Onedia Street

Appleton, WI 54911

(920) 832-6168

crortvedt@apl.org


Publicity:
Tasha Saecker

Elisha D. Smith Public Library

440 First Street

Menasha, WI 54952

(920) 967-3661

saecker@menashalibrary.org

Registration:
Desiree Bongers

Ripon Public Library

120 Jefferson Street

Ripon, WI 54971

(920) 748-6160

dbongers@riponlibrary.org

Mike Thomas

Neenah Public Library

P.O. Box 569

Neenah, WI 54957

(920) 886-6315

thomas@neenahlibrary.org

Technology:
Joe Bongers

Elisha D. Smith Public Library

440 First Street

Menasha, WI 54952

(920) 967-3690

bongers@menashalibrary.org

Tours:

Julie W. Fricke

Lawrence University

113 South Lawe Street
Appleton, WI 54912-0599
(920) 832-6700
julie.w.fricke@lawrence.edu


WLA Staff Liaison:
Brigitte Rupp Vacha
Wisconsin Library Association
5250 E. Terrace Drive, Suite A-1
Madison, WI 53718-8345
608-245-3640
ruppvacha@scls.lib.wi.us
 

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

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Wednesday, October 21, 2009

It's Like Magic:  A shortcut to check out Tuesday again!

 

7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

♦ Registration

    Radisson Paper Valley Hotel Pool Dome Area

 

7:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

♦ All Conference Continental Breakfast

    Lawrence

 

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. 

♦ Past Presidents Breakfast 

    Hickory

 

8:00 a.m.

♦ Youth Services Section Board Meeting

     Clark

 

8:45 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

 

♦ Keynote Address: The Magic of Social Networks

    Empire  

 

wed

Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Internet & American Life Project  

Lee Rainie discusses his organizations latest findings and why they suggest that libraries can play a role in peoples social networks in the future.  He will describe the reasons that people rely more and more on their social networks using old and new technology as they seek information, share ideas, learn, solve problems and look for social support.  Hell describe why the Internet and cell phones have changed the way people construct and operate their social networks and why this opens new magical opportunities for librarians to do what they naturally do: act as nodes in peoples networks. 

 

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

♦ Internet Caf/strong>

    Exective Boardroom

♦ Exhibits   No Conflict:  10:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

    Grand Ballroom

Join us for a fun grand opening and visit our many returning and new exhibitors.

♦ WLA Foundation Silent Auction

    Briarwood

Your chance to win beautiful artwork, tasty food, vacation getaways, valuable services, and more -- while benefiting the WLA Foundation!  All bids close at 3:30 on Thursday.
 

 

10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

♦ ADA Refreshed: Ensuring Access for Everyone

    McIntosh

Robin A. Jones, Director of the Great Lakes ADA Center  

2010 marks the 20th anniversary of the ADA, yet many entities struggle to meet their obligations under the law. The rules have remained the same, but we have learned a thing or two about creating accessible physical and virtual environments. Customers are savvier about their rights, and the growing older population is swelling the ranks of individuals experiencing one or more limitations. Learn what is new, what works and how to ensure your library is accessible to everyone.

 

♦ Circulation Services Round Table Business Meeting

    Kimberly

♦ Environmental Public Health Tracking Network: What It Means to You

    Redwood

Marni Y.V. Bekkedal, Program Manager, Wisconsin Division of Public Health

The Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking program is part of a national effort to better integrate data and information for environmental contaminants and their relationship to human health.  As part of this effort, the program has created a web-based data query system that includes data for a number of priority topics, including childhood lead poisoning, carcinogenic emissions and asthma.  Additionally, the site includes individual County Environmental Health Profiles that summarize the data in a printable report for each county in Wisconsin.  The site can support efforts for local agencies, community groups, advocacy groups and interested individuals to explore relevant data and obtain additional information related to environmental health.

♦ If Trees Could Talk: Stories about Wisconsin Trees

    Cortland

R. Bruce Allison, Arborist and Author

Mr. Allison, in discussing his new book, If Trees Could Talk: Stories about Wisconsin Trees, will explore famous trees in Wisconsin and share stories of historical significance

♦ JOBS Projects in Wisconsin:  What Wisconsin Libraries Are Doing to Help

    People Find Jobs

    Lawrence
 

Barbara Huntington, Moderator, Youth and Special Needs Consultant, DPI; Leah Langby, Special Needs Consultant, Indianhead Federated Library System; Lisa Mettauer, Outreach Librarian, Madison Public Library; Kris Neiman, Head of Administrative Services, Kenosha Public Library  

The national economic problems have affected workers all over Wisconsin. Many public libraries have initiated projects to help workers find new jobs and improve their job skills. A panel of librarians and their partnering agencies, who have been involved with employment support efforts, will discuss what they have done together to help workers in their respective communities. Highlights of what systems are doing to help employment efforts of their libraries will also be included.

♦ Light a Fire in the Reference Service Make the AskAway Virtual

    Reference Work for You, Your Patrons and Your Library! 

    Crown/Bond

Martha Farley Berninger, Librarian Supervisor, Wisconsin Reference & Loan Library; Mark Beatty, Trainer, WiLS; Joy Schwarz, Web Librarian, Winnefox Library System  

Virtual reference service offers huge benefits for patrons, libraries and librarians.  The statewide AskAway virtual reference service can connect your library with folks who never walk through your doors, offer 24/7 help to your current patron base, build relationships with your young adult patrons and allow your staff to develop vital new skill sets.  Join a panel of AskAway librarians and administrators ready to share ideas on the best ways to make the AskAway virtual reference service work to everyones advantage. 

 

♦ Open-Source Library Automation: All Grown-Up

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

wed

Susan Buchanan, VP Library Partners, LibLime

Susan Buchanan will give an overview of recently enhanced modules in Koha, including a new staff interface with improvements to OPAC, acquisitions, cataloging, serials and reporting. For libraries who fear they can't take advantage of the benefits of open source, Susan will discuss the perceived barriers to implementation and show how libraries can now enjoy the advantages of open source--with or without an IT staff.

 

♦ Speaking Up for Teen Services

     Evergreen

 

Penny Johnson, Teen Specialist, Baraboo Public Library; Jesse Vieau, Teen Services Librarian, Madison Public Libary

Why should you be an advocate for teen services? Because you are the voice for teens! You know that teens need access to excellent library staff, resources and services, but many important library leaders, elected officials and policy makers do not. Its up to you to ensure theyre informed. Attendees will learn how to incorporate simple advocacy efforts into their daily work routine, recruit parents and teens to be advocates, create and use talking points and testimonials, conduct successful interactions with decision and policy makers, and more. Attendees will also learn about free advocacy resources from the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA).

 

♦ Twitter in Libraries

     Linden/Rosewood

 

Tasha Saecker, Director, Elisha D. Smith Public Library

Those 140 characters in a Twitter message (sometimes called a tweet) can go surprisingly far to answer typical questions asked of librarians. Hear from several librarians, both academic and public, about using Twitter as part of their suite of communication tools.

♦ Wellness: For the Health of It!

    Pippin
 

wed

Wolfgang Wallschlaeger, Counselor AODA/Prevention Specialist/Mental Health Facilitator

An interactive PowerPoint presentation and discussion on wellness of the mind, body and spirit for longevity.

 

PowerPoint Presentation Available

 

 

12:15 p.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)  

    R. Bruce Allison, Author

       If Trees Could Talk:  Stories about Wisconsin Trees

       Every Root is an Anchor:  Wisconsin's Famous and Historic Trees

 

12:15 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

♦ Association of Wisconsin Special Librarians Business Meeting

    Clark

♦ YSS Luncheon Every Picture Tells a Story: The Language of Art in 

    Childrens Picture Books

    Empire

 

wed

Amy Cdova, Artist/Illustrator

Known for her vibrant paintings that tenderly reflect culture and a sense of place, Taos, NM, artist and gallery owner Amy Cdova will discuss her world as an illustrator.  Cdova, a 2008 Pura Belpre Honors award recipient for What Can You Do With a Rebozo? (TenSpeed Press, Berkeley), will share her latest 2009 releases, Namaste! (Bellpond, NY) and Juan and the Jackalope (UNM). 

 

 

2:00 p.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)  

    Amy Cdova, Artist/Illustrator

       Namaste!

       Juan and the Jackalope

 

2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

♦ Author David McGlynn

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

David McGlynn, Author and Assistant Professor of English, Lawrence University

Professor McGlynn will talk about his collection of short stories, The End of the Straight and Narrow: Stories.  McGlynn is a fiction and creative nonfiction writer. His works have appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Image, Mid-American Review, Shenandoah, and other literary journals.

♦ Connecting Wisconsins Job Seekers and Employers

    Linden/Rosewood

 

Linda Williamson, Business Area Manager, JobCenterofWisconsin.com; Rebecca Powell, Business Area Manager, JobCenterofWisconsin.com

Are you wondering how to assist customers who need help finding a job? Learn about JobCenterOfWisconsin.com, the services available to job seekers, workshops and resources, and tips about how to help customers use the website.  

♦ (The) Curious Nature of Order, or, How I Learned to Love Classification

    Hickory

 

Hope A. Olson, Professor and Associate Dean, UW-Milwaukee  

Its not just in libraries its everywhere its in your mind, your body, the weather, the economy; its even in outer space. It tells you whether or not men still do less housework than women. Non-library examples show us classifications enormous potential impact and LIS contributes principles that can improve how other fields organize, well, everything. Join us for the politics, the economics and the curious nature of classification.

 

♦ Dyslexia: Health, Literacy and Libraries

    Crown/Bond

 

Dr. Julie A. Gocey, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, UW School of Medicine and Public Health; Margery Katz, M.A., J.D., Librarian and Dyslexia Tutor

Librarians are in pivotal positions to improve literacy for the large population of individuals with dyslexia through literacy programs, collection development, reference services and attention to accessibility.  Dr. Julie Gocey, a pediatrician and the founder of the Learning Differences Network, will speak on the medical aspects of dyslexia and effective community services.  Margery Katz, a librarian and dyslexia tutor, will discuss resources on dyslexia, multisensory reading instruction and what librarians should know about dyslexia.  

 

♦ Exploring Wisconsin Opera Houses

    Cortland

 

Jim Draeger, Architectural Historian  

Jim will discuss the ten Wisconsin opera houses and theaters featured in the Wisconsin Historical Society Press new book, Encore! The Renaissance of Wisconsin Opera Houses. He will explore the history of these buildings: why they were built, why they closed or began to deteriorate and, finally, what their communities did to restore them.

♦ MacGyver Library: Amazingly Useful Stunts You Can Perform with

    Ordinary Library Objects

    Evergreen

 

Jon Mark Bolthouse, Automation Librarian, UW Colleges; Chris Grugel, Reference Librarian, Carthage College

Ok, so you may not ever have to diffuse a bomb using a roll of microfilm and an electronic eraser. That doesnt mean that there arent numerous technology gadgets that can save your patrons day anyway. In this fast-paced and entertaining presentation, Chris and Jon Mark will show you how to do everything from running Firefox on an aging iPod to five-minute vodcasting and much more!  Be sure to bring your own gadgets and ideas to the presentation; there will be time for everyone to examine the gadgets on hand and share tips and tricks from their own libraries.

♦ Puppetry, Tomfoolery & All the World's a Stage: Storytimes with Puppets

    McIntosh

 

Pat Hewitt-McNichols, Youth Services Manager, Neenah Public Library; Deb Andrews, Assistant Librarian, Neenah Public Library; Martha Moore, Assistant Librarian, Neenah Public Library

Most grown-ups don't have this much fun.  We do; we're storytime puppeteers!  It's not all good times, though -- especially when you're struggling to come up with a fresh idea or must-have prop.  We'll discuss staging, tips for scripts, use of props and sound, selecting puppets, and voicing and bringing characters to life.  Enjoy demonstration performances and find out why it's worth all the trouble.


♦ Science is a BLAST!

    Pippin

 

Sonja Ackerman, Library Media Specialist, Wausau School District; Ruhama Kordatzky Bahr, Youth Services Librarian and Library Consultant; Deborah Olguin, Youth Services Librarian, Franklin Public Library; Diane Peterson, Youth Services Librarian, Marathon County Public Library 

Here is a programming idea for you that goes beyond early literacy and book clubs. Science has so many possibilities, and its exciting for kids. You dont have to be a science guru to incorporate science into your programming! Listen to these panelists as they share their success stories on how to incorporate science into your childrens programming. This is also a great opportunity to partner with your local teachers! Forget about booking Mad Science, do it yourself!

♦ Tour of the Library at the Winnebago Mental Health Institute and the

    Julaine Farrow Museum (bus will be available on first come - first serve basis)

 

Mary Campfield Kotschi, Director, Winnebago Mental Health Institute

The library supports the Winnebago Mental Health Institute (WMHI), which serves as a specialized component in a community-based mental health delivery system. In 1973, the state made county boards responsible for the general care and treatment of the mentally ill. WMHI is responsible for meeting the needs for specialized services that cannot be met by community agencies. Winnebago's programs are designed to serve children, adolescents, adults and forensic patients requiring specialized mental health services.

 

The Julaine Farrow Museum is dedicated to Mrs. Julaine Farrow (1917-1991), who was a registered nurse at Winnebago Mental Health Institute for 36 years. It was through the personal interest of Mrs. Farrow that the history of Winnebago was gathered and preserved. The museum is the recipient of a recent LSTA grant to digitize their records.

♦ Wisconsin Libraries Say Cheese! Using Pictures to Tell the Library Story
    Redwood

Peter Gilbert, Chair, WLA Foundation Campaign Action Committee; Martha Gammons, WLA Foundation Campaign Action Committee Member; Lia Vellardita, WLA Foundation Campaign Action Committee Member; Annie Rauh, WLA Foundation Campaign Action Committee Member
The Campaign for Wisconsin Libraries, a program of the WLA Foundation, wants to show the world the business - and the busy-ness - of libraries. Wisconsin Libraries Say Cheese! will be created on Flickr the week of November 1, and then unveiled to the media November 18. By enlisting the Wisconsin library community to post snapshots online, the Campaign will showcase the rich and varied services offered in libraries of all types across the state.  Attend this program and learn how to include your librarys story in pictures!

 

3:15 p.m. 4:00 p.m.  

♦ Exhibits No Conflict

    Grand Ballroom

 

3:30 p.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)  

    Jim Draeger, Architectural Historian

       Encore! The Renaissance of Wisconsin Opera Houses

       Fill 'Er Up:  The Glory Days of Wisconsin Gas Stations

     David McGlynn, Author

       The End of the Straight and Narrow:  Stories  

 

 

4:00 p.m. 5:15 p.m.

 

♦ After the Honeymoon: Strategies for Success as a New/Emerging

    Librarian

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

wedMelissa McLimans, Digital Services Librarian, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Center; ">Kelley Hinton, Instruction & Public Services Librarian, UW-Waukesha; Reference Librarian, Brown Deer Public Library; Katharine Clark, Library Assistant, Sequoya Branch, Madison Public Library

These librarians, prot of WLAs WeLead program, will discuss strategies for ensuring success and fulfillment as an early career professional. From participating in conferences to joining committees to seeking mentors and pursuing professional development opportunities, they will offer their insights on how to succeed after landing a first job. The WeLead program identifies potential leaders and provides them access to training, mentoring and networking opportunities.

 

♦ Best Books for Young Adults: 2010 Nominees

    Evergreen

 

Cooperative Childrens Book Center Librarians

Librarians from the Cooperative Children's Book Center of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison will talk about some of the books that have been nominated for the American Library  Association's 2010 Best Books for Young Adults list.  Hear their take on what they find outstanding, admirable and underwhelming on the list.

 

♦ Beyond Cervantes: Effectively Selecting Spanish Language Materials

    Crown/Bond

 

RenBue, Bilingual Outreach Coordinator, Hedberg Public Library

Selecting quality Spanish language materials that is also appropriate for your community and library can be exhausting and frustrating. Learn what the best resources are for making the selection process easier and more effective.

 

♦ Canoe the Open Content Rapids

    Hickory

 

Dorothea Salo, Digital Repository Librarian,UW-Madison

Copyright and "permissions culture" drowning your and your patrons' creativity? Open Content is your liferaft!  Learn about various Open Content movements, from open access to open educational resources to the vast ocean of Creative Commons text, images and multimedia. Learn how to spot Open Content in the wild, search for the Open Content you need, harness Open Content for yourself and your patrons, and create more Open Content to enrich the world.  In the March 15, 2009, issue of Library Journal (picture on page 58), Salo was named one of 2009s Movers & Shakers, the people shaping the future of libraries.  She also has a blog: Caveat Lector, Reader Beware at http://cavlec.yarinareth.net/. Her passion is open content.   

 

♦ Is Your Community "Money Smart"?

    Redwood
 

Lori Burgess, Reference Librarian, Fond du Lac Public Library; Christine Arkenberg, Coordinator of Business and Technology, Milwaukee Public Library

Jeff Dawson, Director, Lester Public Library; Dave Mancl, Director, Office of Financial Literacy

Is the poor economy hitting your community? Do residents recognize the library as a place to find free, unbiased financial information and programs? Your library can get free, knowledgeable speakers and advertising materials to provide financial literacy programminghow, you ask? Get involved with Money Smart Week Wisconsin(SM)!, which allows you the opportunity to network with local bankers, educators and community leaders to provide unbiased financial literacy programs in your library and throughout your community. Governor Doyle's Council on Financial Literacy and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago provide support for local programs, events and advertising.  Find out how your library can get involved.

 

♦ Notable Books Marathon

    Empire

 

Helene Androski, Retired Librarian; Kirsten Houtman, Member Services Librarian, WILS; Elizabeth Amundson, Librarian, Madison Public Library;

Jean Anderson, Continuing Education/Multitype Coordinator, South Central Library System; Eliot Finkelstein, Academic Librarian, UW-Madison

An annual event offering thoughtful, inspiring, humorous and fast-paced reviews of notable titles selected from the ALA Notable Books list and the WLA Literary Awards Committees notable books. Our presenters are all experienced, knowledgeable book talk and discussion leaders.

 

♦ Public Library System Technical Services in the 21st Century

    Cortland

 

Jane Richard, Member Services Librarian, WiLS; Nichole Fromm, Cataloger, Madison Public Library

Public library systems in Wisconsin operate/manage under environments unique to each locale, yet systems share many of the same challenges: shrinking budgets, patron expectations for more electronic resources, the changing face of technical services; even keeping up with technology seems to be a full-time job. On top of it all, serious questions are being raised about the effectiveness of the ILS. In the spring 2009, WiLS staff surveyed Wisconsin public library systems to identify patterns and trends in their present tech services workflows. Join us in an overview of the findings, with discussions about the variations, such as centralized versus de-centralized cataloging, and how to manage authority control.

♦ Strategic Planning for Any Sized Library

    Linden/Rosewood

Rose Frost, Director, Platteville Public Library

Rose has used the PLA process as a public library director in Michigan and Wisconsin.  While a public library consultant at the Utah State Library in Salt Lake City, she created a modified step-by-step guide for strategic planning for rural public libraries.  Rose also facilitated the Strategic Planning for Results process for numerous Utah public libraries and taught workshops for public library directors and trustees.  This program will provide basic, practical how to information about PLA's Strategic Planning for Results.  The program outlines how to organize a community planning committee, analyze a community and library SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats), establish realistic goals and objectives, explains how your plan impacts your budget, explains organizational competencies, how to implement the plan and reporting the results.

 

♦ Unleashing Literacys Best Friend: The Remarkable Relationship Between

    Dogs and Young Readers

    McIntosh

 

wedwedCraig Pierce, Children's Writer; Honey the Greyhound, Reading Therapy Dog

In a high-tech educational environment, one of the most profound influences on childrens literacy remains the happy, humble dog. Join Craig Pierce, the writer of the American Dog book series, and Honey his rescued greyhound sidekick, as they take you on a journey into the evolving role of dogs in childrens literature and their positive impact in todays classrooms and libraries.

♦ Were Casting and Theyre Biting!

    Pippin

 

Beth Carpenter, Director, Kimberly-Little Chute Public Library; Gerard Saylor, Director, L.D. Fargo Public Library; Brian Kopetsky, Assistant Circulation Supervisor, Appleton Public Library; Kristin M. Woodward, Instructional Design Librarian/Academic Librarian, UWM Libraries

Librarians are using podcasts, vodcasts and screencasts to create content, market library programs and promote services. Learn about casting projects being developed in Wisconsin libraries and beyond. Learn what worked, what didnt, the tools used and ideas for future projects.

 

♦ WISCAT Resource Sharing Community: An Update  

    Aspen

 

Vickie Long, WISCAT Training & Technical Support, DPI; Beth Palmquist, WISCAT Database Manager, DPI

WISCAT continues to improve on a number of fronts. Join us to learn about the new or improved features of the WISCAT Resource Sharing System. These include: incorporating recent BadgerLink changes, improved ILL forms, new splash page options, RSS feeds, changes to format checking for ILL requests and patron cancellations of requests. Updates on interlibrary loan, cataloging and the Z39.50 gateway are also covered. Bring your questions and comments to this informational session!

 

5:30 p.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)  

    Craig Pierce, Children's Writer

       A Greyhound's Tale:  Running for Glory, Walking for Home

       A Labrador's Tale:  An Eye for Heroism

       A Labrador's Tale 2:  The Incredible Thank You Gift

       Sit, stay, work, play, All Dogs have their Day

 

5:30 6:30 p.m.  

 

♦ Resource Sharing Round Table Business Meeting

    Kimberly

 

♦ Wisconsin KOHA Enthusiasts Business Meeting

    Aspen

 

6:00 p.m.

♦ READ Book Discussion: History of Love by Nicole Krauss

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

Gary Warren Niebuhr, Director, Greendale Public Library

Join Gary in a discussion of The History of Love, a hauntingly beautiful novel about two characters whose lives are woven together in such complex ways that even after the last page is turned, the reader is left to wonder what really happened. In the hands of a less gifted writer, unraveling this tangled web could easily give way to complete chaos. However, under Krauss' watchful eye, these twists and turns only strengthen the impact of this enchanting book. The History of Love spans a period of over 60 years and takes readers from Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe to present day Brighton Beach. At the center of each main character's psyche is the issue of loneliness, and the need to fill a void left empty by lost love. Leo Gursky is a retired locksmith who immigrates to New York after escaping SS officers in his native Poland, only to spend the last stage of his life terrified that no one will notice when he dies. ("I try to make a point of being seen. Sometimes when I'm out, I'll buy a juice even though I'm not thirsty.") Fourteen-year-old Alma Singer vacillates between wanting to memorialize her dead father and finding a way to lift her mother's veil of depression. At the same time, she's trying to save her brother Bird, who is convinced he may be the Messiah, from becoming a 10-year-old social pariah. As the connection between Leo and Alma is slowly unmasked, the desperation, along with the potential for salvation, of this unique pair is also revealed.  

 

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

♦ UW-Madison School of Library and Information Studies Reunion

    McIntosh  

♦ UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies Reunion

    Pippin

 

8:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.wedm.

♦ WLA Foundation Fundraiser:  Suite Sorcery: An

    Evening of Music & Desserts

    Lawrence University

Spend an evening in Suite Sorcery at the brand spankin' new Richard and Margot Warch Campus Center on the Lawrence University Campus. The WLA Foundation is fortunate to be the first public event to be held at this stunning, very recently completed facility that has an incredible view overlooking the Fox River. Arrive early to appreciate the view. Whilst enjoying the facility and the view, please feel free to enjoy 'suite' desserts concocted by the caterers of Lawrence University. Enjoy a beverage or two and laugh at the antics of the street performers and applaud the performances of the Lawrence University music students.  Partake of the shuttle or enjoy the evening walk to the campus facility.  Enjoy suites/sweets while supporting your WLA Foundation with your donation.

Ticket Required:  $35.00 (check it off on the Registration Form)

 

Exhibitors Information

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Exhibitors Valley Expo & Displays is the official general service provider for our conference.  Please use the Service Kit for any additional equipment and/or services you may need.  
In addition, we ask that you use the Exhibitor Meal Registration Form to indicate your box lunch choice for both Wednesday and Thursday, as well as any other meal functions you wish to attend.

We ask nonprofit organization to use this Exhibitor Meal Registration Form to order any meal choices, including box lunch choices.


Invitation to Exhibitors, Advertisers and Sponsors

 

How would you like all your library customers and prospects in one place at one time?  That would make your sales efforts more efficient and effective, wouldnt it?  Well, the Wisconsin Library Association (WLA) will bring the library community together at its annual conference from October 20-23, 2009.  Join us at the Radisson Paper Valley in Appleton, and you will have innumerable opportunities to showcase your company and its products and services.

 

♦      Exhibit Space -- contract and floor plan.  Exhibits will be open Wednesday, October 21, from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and Thursday, October 22, from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm.  All vendors will be listed in our conference booklet, and door prize contributors will receive special mention.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Michael Nitz at mnitz@apl.org, this years Exhibits Chair, or Brigitte Rupp Vacha, WLA Conference Liaison, at ruppvacha@scls.lib.wi.us.

 

♦      Partnership Opportunities -- contract.  Reinforce your commitment to libraries and increase your visibility outside the exhibit hall by sponsoring specific programs.  Even if you cant exhibit (though we dont know why you wouldnt want to), a program partnership ensures your companys visibility at this important professional conference.  If you have any questions, please contact Lynn Stainbrook at stainbrook_lm@co.brown.wi.us, this years Partnership Chair.

 

♦      Booklet Advertising -- contract.  Every registered attendee receives a program booklet. Its a roadmap to the conference and a valuable post-conference resource.  Advertise in the booklet to encourage visits to your booth, as well as follow up contacts.  This opportunity is also open to companies not exhibiting at this years event.  If you have any questions regarding advertising opportunities, again contact this years Advertising Chair, Lynn Stainbrook at stainbrook_lm@co.brown.wi.us

 

♦      Vendor Membership -- application.  Join WLA today for discounts on your booth and other great benefits.  Membership offers you year-round opportunities to reach the Library community. 

 

We appreciate the opportunity to work with you.  Together, we will make the 2009 WLA Annual Conference the best yet.  Contact the WLA office at (608) 245-3640 if you have any questions.   Hope to see you in Appleton!

 

Sincerely,

Exhibitors info

Barbara Kelly

2009 Conference Committee Chair

Featured Speakers

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Featured SpeakersR. Bruce Allison, Arborist and Author

Bruce Allison has been a professional arborist in Madison, Wisconsin, since 1974. He will discuss his new book If Trees Could Talk: Stories about Wisconsin Trees.  He is also the author of Wisconsins Champion Trees: A Tree Hunters Guide (1980, revised 2005); Tree Walks of Dane County (1981); Tree Walks of Milwaukee County (1982) and Every Root an Anchor: Wisconsins Famous and Historic Trees (2005). His articles have appeared in the Wisconsin Academy Review, Wisconsin Alumni Magazine, Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine, American Forests Magazine, Arboricultural Journal, and Shading Our Cities (Island Press, 1989). He earned degrees from Brown University and from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He served as president of the Wisconsin Arborist Association and as chairman of the Dane County Tree Board and the Wisconsin Urban Forestry Council.

 

Featured SpeakersFeatured SpeakersTerese Allen, Author and Food Columnist

Culinary historian, Barbara Haber, has written that if we really want to understand our past, weve got to follow the food. Thats particularly true in Wisconsin, whose food traditions reflect the richness of an ethnically and agriculturally diverse region. In this presentation Terese Allen shares the stories behind (and recipes for) such varied foodways as cream puffs, Hmong egg rolls, and brandy old fashions. From Friday night fish fry to smashed Yukon Gold potatoes with Hooks blue cheese, Allen tracks the amazing cornucopia of what Wisconsinites have gathered, grown, produced, cooked, and eaten.

 

Featured SpeakersLynda Barry

Author of What It Is and winner of the 2009 RR Donnelley Award, presented by the Literary Awards Committee of the WLA Readers Section, Lynda offers us insight into how she overcame self-doubt, as well as the doubts of others, to follow her muse, and in the process become one of Americas leading cartoonists.  Part memoir, part writers guide, Lynda does a brilliant job of using her own experiences to illustrate that each of us has the power to create within us. 

 

Marni Y.V. Bekkedal, Program Manager, Wisconsin Division of Public Health

The Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking program is part of a national effort to better integrate data and information for environmental contaminants and their relationship to human health.  As part of this effort, the program has created a web-based data query system that includes data for a number of priority topics including childhood lead poisoning, carcinogenic emissions, and asthma.  Additionally, the site includes individual County Environmental Health Profiles that summarize the data in a printable report for each county in Wisconsin.  The site can support efforts for local agencies, community groups, advocacy groups and interested individuals to explore relevant data and obtain additional information related to environmental health.

 

Lynne Blinkenberg, Director of Community Engagement, Wisconsin Public Television

This annual contest, sponsored by Wisconsin Public Television and Reading Rainbow, is for kindergarteners through 3rd graders, and libraries are a natural partner. Learn how to host a writers & illustrators event in your library, sponsor a local contest, or just get tips on helping to spread the word.

 

Marjorie E. Bloss, Former RDA Project Manager and Lecturer, Dominican University, GSLIS Program

Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) and Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD) are the building blocks on which the new cataloging code, RDA, Resource Description and Access is built. These conceptual models describe a bibliographic world in which a works relationships to its different physical formats, to translations, adaptations and interpretations, to the people or corporate bodies responsible for them, and to their subjects, interrelate. It is only now that technology has given us the appropriate tools that we can fully realize how to pull together these bibliographic relationships.

 

Featured Speakers

Susan Buchanan

Susan Buchanan, Vice President, Library Partners, LibLime, will give an overview of recently enhanced modules in Koha, including a new staff interface with improvements to OPAC, acquisitions, cataloging, serials and reporting. For libraries who fear they can't take advantage of the benefits of open source, Susan will discuss the perceived barriers to implementation and show how libraries can now enjoy the advantages of open source--with or without an IT staff.

 

 

Featured SpeakersAmy Cordova
Known for her vibrant paintings that tenderly reflect culture and a sense of place, Taos, NM, artist and gallery owner Amy Cordova will discuss her world as an illustrator.  Cordova, a 2008 Pura Belpre Honors award recipient for What Can You Do With a Rebozo? (TenSpeed Press, Berkeley), will share her latest 2009 releases, Namaste! (Bellpond, NY) and Juan and the Jackalope (UNM). Cordova will present a slideshow on NAMASTE! and the early stages of developing the work in Nepal.  Cordova will also speak of the movement and value of bilingual books for children.

Amy Cordova, born in southwest Wisconsin, spent her childhood roaming river bluffs and streambedsimagining she was a deer!  Her father, a native New Mexican of Spanish/Native American descent, was part of a family whose cultural traditions were extremely dissimilar from Cordovas Midwestern upbringing.  Cordovas life of diverse cultural blending influenced the way she learned to view the world and deeply inspires her life as an artist. 

Cordova attended the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Viterbo College and Highlands University, NM.  She has made her living as a full time artist for the past thirty years and has served as an arts educator and advocate working with children, teens and adults. Cordova has created large scale public art projects, including the RIVERSONG windows for the St. Paul RiverCentre.  She currently teaches a special course at the University of Nebraska.

Cordova lives in Taos, NM , where she and her partner, Dan Enger, own the ENGER-CORDOVA FINE ART GALLERY, which features their original art.

 

Stacy Grandt, Outreach Director, Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Stacy Grandt will provide information about specialized formats that include tactile graphics used by people who are blind, have a print disability, or low vision.  Participants will gain insight into how to prepare tactiles to use with existing materials, as well as resources to acquire ready-made tactiles.  She will also include specific information about materials that support the inclusion of children who are blind or have low vision, including those with multiple disabilities in public library programs.   She coordinated the production of tactile graphic items for the 2009 Summer Reading Program and is currently working on materials for the 2010 program.

 

Featured SpeakersMarcy Heim

CFRE, Principal, The Artful Asker, LLC

With over two decades of advancement experience, Marcy brings a sincere respect and energy for the transforming impact philanthropy can have on our organizations and throughout our communities. Recognized as an excellent and entertaining presenter, she combines her experience with a large, public research university, a small independent school and a variety of clients into thoughtful workshops, seminars and consulting on topics including fund raising, personal accountability, board development, non-profit management and creative donor relations. Her specialities include non-profit coaching in major gifts, staff motivation and retention programs, board development, fundraising planning.  Her topic at this year's conference, Motivational Magic--Keeping Your Passion in Challenging Times, promises to help us feel excited about our work and rekindle and reignite the passion we want to feel as we go through our days.

 

Robin A. Jones, Director of the Great Lakes ADA Center  

2010 marks the 20th anniversary of the ADA, yet many entities struggle to meet their obligations under the law. The rules have remained the same, but we have learned a thing or two about creating accessible physical and virtual environments. Customers are savvier about their rights, and the growing older population is swelling the ranks of individuals experiencing one or more limitations. Learn what is new, what works and how to ensure your library is accessible to everyone.

 

 

Featured SpeakersAllan M. Kleiman, Library Consultant and Member of ALA's Gaming Experts Panel

For over 30 years, Allan Kleiman has shared his expertise as a speaker, workshop leader and library educator in the areas of library service to older adults, public libraries, diversity and technology. In 2005, he was one of only four librarians to attend the White House Conference on Aging and, in 2006, he was awarded the Margaret Monroe Award from the American Library Association. He is the past Chair of ALAs Library Service to an Aging Population Committee and is now a full-time library trainer, workshop leader and consultant.

 

Featured SpeakersTomas Lipinski, JD, LLM, PhD,  has worked in a variety of legal settings, including the private, public and non-profit sectors.  He has taught at the American Institute for Paralegal Studies and at Syracuse University College of Law. In summers, he is a visiting associate professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  Dr. Lipinski currently teaches, researches and speaks frequently on various topics within the areas of information law and policy, especially copyright, privacy and free speech issues in schools and libraries, and serves as Co-Director of the Center for Information Policy Research at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

 

Featured Speakers

Angela Maycock, Assistant Director, ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom

Angela Maycock provides guidance and support to librarians, teachers and others on the application of ALAs intellectual freedom policies and the First Amendment in specific situations involving materials challenges and confidentiality in the library.  She also undertakes projects to educate librarians and the general public about intellectual freedom issues through speaking engagements, conference programming and initiatives such as ALAs National Conversation on Privacy.  Angela is passionate about connecting librarians with the resources they need to confront the complex challenges to intellectual freedom in libraries today.  Prior to her work at ALA, Angela served as Reference and Instruction Librarian at the Michigan State University Libraries.  She received her M.S. degree in Library Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her B.A. from Penn State University.

 

Featured SpeakersDavid McGlynn, Author and Assistant Professor of English, Lawrence University

David McGlynn was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and grew up in Houston, Texas, and Orange County, California.  He graduated in 1998 with a B.A. in English and Philosophy from the University of California, Irvine.  He received an M.F.A., in 2001, and a Ph.D., in 2006, from the University of Utah, where he also served as Managing Editor of Western Humanities Review.  His fiction and creative nonfiction have appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Image, Mid-American Review, Shenandoah, and other literary journals. He currently teaches at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, where he lives with his wife and sons.

 

Featured SpeakersBen Merens

Host of the daily At Issue with Ben Merens, on Wisconsin Public Radio, Merens states that "after 25 years as a journalist and 15 as a talk show host, I have come to the conclusion that PEOPLE ARE DYING TO BE HEARD, and that we all need to listen better to each other. Today's society says that in order to keep up with global trends, we have to multi-task. I disagree. We can't do it all. It's just impossible. And while we can watch TV and read a book at the same time, we can't do either well. To do your best, you need to focus your thoughts. You need to listen to your kids. You need to free your mind of all the clutter and really hear your client, co-worker, boss or spouse. You need to take the time to focus on one person or task at a time. I call this ability to focus: Uni-Tasking.

Merens has been a talk show host and producer at Wisconsin Public Radio since October 1991, when he began as host/producer of "Everybody's Business," a nightly business talk show. In 1995, he became producer of "Conversations with Kathleen Dunn." At that time he was also named Ideas Network fill-in host and election-night anchor. Because of Ben's 15-year tenure at Wisconsin Public Radio, he is a known quantity to Ideas Network listeners.

 

Featured SpeakersFeatured SpeakersCraig Pierce, Children's Writer; Honey the Greyhound, Reading Therapy Dog

In a high-tech educational environment, one of the most profound influences on childrens literacy remains the happy, humble dog. Join Craig Pierce, the writer of the American Dog book series, and Honey, his rescued greyhound sidekick, as they take you on a journey into the evolving role of dogs in childrens literature and their positive impact in todays classrooms and libraries.

 

to fulfill those roles.  Jeff is a frequent presenter at local, state, regional and international conferences.Featured Speakers

Jeffrey Russell

Established in 1987, Russell Consulting, Inc., has been developing leadership programs to help organizations and businesses increase the capacity of their leaders and employees to identify and better understand the challenges and opportunities in their organizations.  Jeff has worked to design programs that define these leadership roles for every level of organizational structure and build competencies 

 

 

Featured Speakers

Wolfgang Wallschlaeger, Counselor and AODA Facilitator, Fox Valley Technical College

Wolfgang has taught in the Addiction Studies Program for more than eight years, teaching personal and professional development, counseling theory 1 & 2, and cross cultural counseling.  His masters degree, while in education, was focused on credits for psychotherapy in Wisconsin.  He spent the first 14 years of his professional life working for Thedacare Behavioral Health.  He's worked in criminal justice programs, AODA programs and dual-diagnosed programs, before accepting a fulltime position at FVTC as the LifeLINE Coordinator.  Those current duties include: ATODA prevention, education and counseling.  Additionally, the job entails mental health counseling for staff and learners.  He brings a diverse background to the adjunct teaching staff, including 18 years as a recovering person, and over 12 years in NAADAC / WAADAC, the professional organization for the addictions field. He, with several members of the teaching staff, serves as a board member in that professional body.  His personal philosophy of recovery has always included replacement activities, involving endurance athletic activities, including triathlon and ultra-marathon, winter activities such as cross country ski marathon racing.   Work, love, play plus creativity dictate the balance he seeks in life.  AODA counseling allows him to be a part of the solution instead of remaining in the problem.

 

Dan White, Director of Program Services, The Rural Library Project, Inc.

The Rural Library Project is a nonprofit organization committed to the establishment of new, small libraries in rural areas. We collaborate with citizens, public library systems and governments in these areas to raise funds for and build libraries in their towns. We view these local public libraries as centers of learning, community building, and civic pride. The specific goals and services of The Rural Library Project are to: *Provide project management services necessary for small rural communities to establish new library facilities. This includes coordinating the design, coordinating and overseeing the construction and overseeing the equipping of the new library to meet community needs and budgets. *Seek and provide challenge grants for rural communities committed to building new library facilities. These challenge grants are to initiate and assist local public fundraising campaigns to establish new libraries. *Seek and provide grants to establish summer reading programs following the construction of new library facilities.