Programs - Thursday

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October 23-26, 2018
Radisson La Crosse and La Crosse Convention Center
200 Harborview Plaza
La Crosse, WI 54601

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Registration
La Crosse Center South Hall Lobby
 

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Breakfast Buffet
La Crosse Center South Hall - Second Floor Hallway

Unit Business Meeting
Intellectual Freedom Special Interest Group Meeting
Support Staff & Circulation Services Meeting
Technical Services Section Meeting
Wisconsin Small Libraries Meeting 
Youth Services Section Leadership Meeting
 

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Activities in the Exhibit Hall

WLA Foundation Silent Auction 

The auction will be open for business until 3:30 p.m. today, at which time you can check to see if you won your bid and, if you’re the lucky winner, pick up and pay!

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Hands-On Programs - Creating a Hot Mess
La Crosse Center South Hall - Lower Level (Outside of Exhibit Hall)

Kathy Kabat, La Crosse Public Library
A hands-on activity in which participants will be creating a hot mess. A hot mess is using a variety of color paints and then painting a random pattern. Apply a stencil on your mess and coat it with white paint; let it dry and peel off the stencil and see what happens.
 

9:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

Health Literacy For the Rest of Us

Kaye Crampton, Gundersen Health Systerm, John & Nettie Mooney Libraries, La Crosse
What is health literacy? Why should you care? Health literacy is important even if you don’t work in the health care field. The consequences of low health literacy affect all of us. In this presentation you will learn: the differences between regular literacy and health literacy., how health literacy affects health care costs, and the cost to people who are not health literate and what librarians can do about health literacy. This presentation will include strategies and practices you can use in your work lives as well as in your roles as parents, managers of chronic illness or as caregivers for aging parents.

"I'll have that $10 sandwich, for $7, please": Saying Enough to Inequitable County Reimbursement

Amanda Hegge, Whitehall Public Library; Jessica Schoonover, Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library, Trempealeau
Across Wisconsin, county boards are reimbursing libraries at 70% of the costs they incur to serve county residents who don’t have a library. Hear the story of how nine Wisconsin Library Directors organized themselves to petition their county to provide these small rural libraries equitable reimbursement (100%) for the services they are providing to all who walk through their doors. The speakers will outline their efforts, provide essential talking points they have found to be successful, and share their insights on the importance of beginning this conversation across counties throughout the state.

Nighttime is Teen Time

Rebecca Barry, Chilton Public Library; Terry Ehle, Lester Public Library, Two Rivers; Lisa Pike, Manitowoc Public Library
Are extracurriculars keeping teens from your after-school programs? Struggling to find the best time to get teens in the door? Then after-hour programs may be for you! From big ideas to small, our panel of late night experts will share their experiences with teen programming after the sun goes down and the library doors close. Panelists will share after-hours experiences including a new community initiative that brings a late night program every weekend to teens in the community; tips and tricks on how to get started; and ideas for monthly themed teen nights and Random Fandom after-hours events.

Not-So-Passive Programming

Susan DeBolt, L.E. Phillips Public Library, Eau Claire; Michaela Walters, L.E. Phillips Public Library, Eau Claire
Looking to engage adult patrons with minimal effort? Try passive programming! Through monthly games and periodic activities, the L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library in Eau Claire has established a following of library participation junkies. We will share ideas that have worked for us, as well as some that haven't. Get tips and tricks on how to keep staff time manageable while still offering new and diverse challenges. Collaboration is key to the success of passive programming, so prepare to share.

Popular Materials Weeding for the Small and Medium Library

Jennifer Bernetzke, Schreiner Memorial Library, Lancaster; Angela Noel, Brodhead Public Library
Weeding can be a difficult and time-consuming task, but we all have to do it. What can a small library do to free up space when some of our patrons’ favorite authors become absurdly prolific? Join us in examining strategies to keep a handle on the Pattersons, Robertses, and Woodses in your collection without alienating your community.

Shaking Up Your Collections!

Candi Fitzsimons, Johnson Public Library, Darlington; Tara Fortney, Schreiner Memorial Library, Lancaster
Turn your Children’s collection into an easily-navigated, exciting treasure trove for your patrons, young and old! Our small libraries completely re-imagined our picture book organization and came up with a fresh, fun way to browse and shelve! Using popular categories, colorful signage and things you already have in your storage closet, you can create a system that your staff and patrons will love to dive into! We’ll also give you tips on how to dump “Dewey” in both your Children’s AND Adult’s sections!

Transform Your Library with a One-Page Strategic Plan

Amanda Standerfer, Fast Forward Libraries
In this session, you'll learn how to develop an engaging and inspiring one-page strategic plan that guides your library to increased usage and support. Transform your library into a strategically-focused learning organization by developing a simple and appealing one-page plan. Your one-page plan will connect to your library's operations and how you measure success. You'll learn about libraries using one-page plans for decision-making, community outreach, and fundraising. Your short plan will generate big results

W(L)TF are we doing? It's Not Just Book Sales and Board Meetings Anymore!

Bill Wilson, Milton Public Library and Arrowhead Library System
WLTF will be conducting its second Trustee and Friends survey in 2018 (the first was in 2016). The survey explores what’s happening in public libraries in regard to Library Boards (orientation of Board members, training activities, advocacy activities, etc.) and the kinds of efforts being undertaken by Friends organizations in support of their libraries (it’s not just book sales anymore). WLTF Board members will present 2018 survey findings and their implications. Bring your questions and experiences for the second half and hear firsthand from other attendees about the effectiveness of their Board and Friend activities.

Your Library as a Resource for Families of Children with Special Needs

Maria Dietrich, Hedberg Public Library, Janesville; Jeni Schomber, Beloit Public Library; Karen Wendt, Monona Public Library
Public or school, rural or urban, large or small--all public libraries serve children with disabilities in their communities. Panelists will share experiences getting started with Sensory Storytimes, and success partnering with a Parenting Connections initiative to make their libraries vibrant hubs where caregivers of children with special needs can connect with local and regional resources. Learn best practices for sustainable community partnerships, how to develop a community need assessment, ideas for programs, and inclusive marketing strategies as well as accessible customer service and how to make existing children’s programs more welcoming for all abilities.

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

No Conflict Time and Break in Exhibit Hall
La Crosse Center - South Hall


11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

The Gender-based Violence in the Hmoob Diaspora Project: A Collaborative, Community-driven Oral History Project

Mai Shoua Vang, Cia Siab, Inc.; Xong Xiong, Cia Siab, Inc.; Maij Xyooj, UW-Madison
Presenters will share the history and ongoing developments of the Gender-based Violence in the Hmoob Diaspora Project, a collaborative oral history project between the University of Wisconsin Archives and Cia Siab, Inc., a non-profit agency that provides culturally empowering advocacy to the Hmoob community. The project aims to support Hmoob folks’ control over their stories while documenting the multiplicity of gender-based violence in the diaspora Hmoob community. In the context of white supremacy, orientalism, institutional/academic marginalization, heteropatriarchy, border imperialism, and economic violence, this project is unique, because it is led by Hmoob women. Presenters will share challenges and successes.

Other Duties As Assigned: What Public Library Management Really Entails

Molly Rach, Blairstown Public Library, Blairstown, Iowa
So you want to be a manager or a director in a public library? As a veteran librarian for almost 15 years, Molly Rach thought she was ready to be a director in a small public library. And then reality hit. Part "what I wish I would have known" and part "here's what I've learned," this session is a look at one director's dive into the deep end of management and what she's learned now that her head is above water.

Say What You Meme! Collection Displays for Every Patron and Occasion

Madelynn Austin Lehman, Warren-Newport Public Library; Jessica Stalker, Warren-Newport Public Library
Displays causing dismay? Are you putting in a lot of hard work with no circ? Or do you just need a refresher?
Displays can be a valuable asset to your library, helping to drive up circulation, advertise programs and little-known areas of your collection. Creating eye-catching displays doesn't have to be complicated, expensive or formulaic.
We’ll explore different ways to advertise your collections that are easy and fun, and can even elicit a giggle from the grouchiest of patrons. Your library’s personality is your greatest asset. Put it on display!

Storytime for Adults: Why Should Kids Have All the Fun?

Linda Jerome, La Crosse Public Library; Barry McKnight, La Crosse Public Library
Storytime isn’t just for kids! Learn how La Crosse Public Library, in partnership with a local brewery, attract standing-room only audiences, which range in age from 20s to 60s+, to a monthly program where librarians from public, academic and school libraries read aloud short stories, essays, book excerpts and one-act plays. You’ll discover how the partnerships between local libraries, businesses and the arts community enrich the cultural life of the community, draw those elusive “new adult” patrons to a library program, and how easy it is to replicate this program in your community.

That Darn Machine: Bringing Digital Literacy Within Reach for People Experiencing Homelessness

Martin Alvarado, Madison Public Library; Julie Arensdorf, UW-Madison Libraries; Mary Fahndrich, Madison Public Library 
Based on the Community Workshop Series developed and sustained in North Carolina since 2005, the UW-Madison Libraries partnered with the Madison Public Library and Operation Welcome Home to develop a digital literacy program for adults experiencing homelessness in the Madison community. The purpose was to offer free, personal and professional computer literacy development opportunities, and to pool the collective resources of the Madison Public Library (MPL), the UW-Madis on Libraries, and the UW-Madison iSchool in offering this resource to the community. Attendees will gain an understanding of the specific context of this partnership, the roles of each organization, how programming was developed, and lessons learned.

This Is Us: Library Expansion and Renovation 2016

Nan Andrews, Walter E. Olson Memorial Library, Eagle River; Mindy Sorg, OPN Architects, Cedar Rapids, IA
Drama · Everyone has a library. And every library has a story. In this heartwarming, emotional story about a unique set of stakeholders, their struggles, and the design and construction team who helped them overcome, "This Is Us" chronicles the Olson Memorial Library through moments of love, joy, triumph and heartbreak. With OPN Architects guidance, they shed the shackles of the past, while stakeholder triplets (Foundation, Trustees and Benefactors) discover deeper meaning in their present-day library. Tune in to find out how the story ends. S1 The Game Plan S2 The Right Thing to Do S3 The Big Day.

Why I Read Picture Books to College Students (And Why You Should Share Them With Everyone)

Katelyn Browne, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
Seven times a semester, I visit a Human Relations class for students who are preparing to be teachers for a read-aloud. The books we share--often picture books, but sometimes sections of novels--connect to their curricular topics, including racism, poverty, bullying and death. No matter your patrons or their ages, a shared read-aloud can be a meaningful and engaging way to center discussions of essential, emotionally charged topics. In this session, Katelyn will share information about her instructional collaboration, comments from students, some recommended titles and advice for expanding read-aloud programming to include non-traditional audiences.

WLTF (Wisconsin Library Trustees and Friends) Business Meeting

Calling all Library Friends and Trustees! Join your colleagues as we start planning for 2019 WLTF activities and initiatives. Bring you best ideas and thoughts about how we can take WLTF to the next level!

"Yeah, Sure, I Don’t Care". A Mantra to Improve your Children’s Area

Kari Preuss, Elroy Public Library, Nikole Verde, Elroy Public Library
Stop looking at the Children’s area as a stodgy Librarian. A small library doubled the children’s checkouts and tripled the summer library program over two years. How? We focused on what is important; what will make the kids WANT to return. We’ll share a few ideas that worked including changes in collection, space, attitudes, collaborations, forgiveness, and a staff who smiling says to the kids, “Yeah, sure, I don’t care.”

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

WLTF Luncheon: Powering Progress: Libraries as Leaders in Community Engagement

Garm MaryMary Garm, Lackawanna County Library System, Scranton, PA
Librarians, trustees, Friends and volunteers have powerful personal and professional networks. Using them effectively is a first step toward turning your library into a valued center for community development and enrichment.

 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

#TimesUp: Customer Service Strategies for Dealing with Sexual Harassment

Betsy Bleck, Oconomowoc Public Library; Rebecca Light, Middleton Public Library; Stephanie Ramirez, Delafield Public Library; Jocelyne Sansing, Middleton Public Library
Most workplace training in today’s world focuses on harassment between employees. That certainly exists in libraries – but so does harassment by the public. Has a patron or colleague ever responded to your top-notch, friendly service by asking you on a date, asking if you're single, critiquing your appearance, following you around the library, or touching you? You can address these situations professionally while still establishing personal boundaries and offering great customer service. In this session we will define sexual harassment, provide strategies for identifying and addressing harassing behavior, and learn how we can empower ourselves and each other.

Advocacy Tool Box for Friends and Trustees

Kathy Lynn Pletcher
, Nicolet Federated Library System, Green Bay; Shannon Schultz, Public Library Development, Department of Public Instruction, Madison; Bill Wilson, Milton Public Library and Arrowhead Library System

Every library needs friends and advocates but, often, libraries fail to provide the tools that their invaluable allies can use to tell their stories effectively. This program will present concrete examples of low cost/ no cost tools that libraries can create in cooperation with their Friends and Trustees to make the case for libraries in their communities. The program will be a combination of "How we did it well" presented by practitioners, trustees, and Friends as well as "How-To" tips that attendees can act on back in their libraries.

Building Relationships between your Public Library and Spanish-Speaking Populations in Your Community

Rebecca Gomez, Neighborhood Housing Services of Southwest Wisconsin, Richland Center; Emily Zorea, Brewer Public Library, Richland Center
The Hispanic/Latino population has become one of the fastest growing minorities in the United States. Yet, studies by the Pew Research Center report that this demographic is one of the least likely groups to utilize their local public libraries. How can libraries better serve the unique cultural and literacy needs of this population? This session will share how one librarian researched and completed a needs assessment for her library to answer that question, with information from community partners on the outreach and relationship building being done now as a result.

Burr/Worzalla Children's Book Award Winner

Darcy Miller, Author, Prairie du Sac
Join this year’s Burr/Worzalla Award winner, as she presents on her book, Roll, a hilariously funny and poignant coming-of-age story about Lauren, who would rather be called “Ren,” who learns about friendship, family and Birmingham Roller Pigeons after he moves to the country.

Miller’s book was selected as the winner by the Children’s Book Award Committee of the WLA Youth Services Section (YSS) after the examination and evaluation of titles from 2017 by authors and illustrators with a Wisconsin connection.

Checking your North Star: Re-evaluating Organizational Values

Jeff Brunner, WiLS, Madison; Melissa McLimans, WiLS, Madison; Emily Pfotenhauer, WiLS, Madison; Carrie Portz, Spring Green Community Library
Having organizational north stars, like an articulated mission and value statements, are important to organizational success and resiliency. After a major reorganization of WiLS in 2013, the staff and board decided in 2018 to make sure mission and values were still appropriate and being lived by staff and board alike. Learn about the process of analyzing and modernizing values, why they added two new values on equity and advocacy, and how they are working to actively support and promote their mission and values. A library director/practicum student involved in the process shares what she learned and how she was able to take it back to benefit her own library.

Did Someone Say Spaetzle?

D Hankins, New Holstein Public Library; Ann Heus, New Holstein Public Library
Are you a small library considering a food-related program, but don't have a kitchen or a big budget? We created a successful, interactive culinary program using just a meeting room, a few carefully selected utensils, and a minimal budget; you can too! Offer your patrons an entertaining, free weeknight program that interests food students of all ages. This session will give you the tools to dream up, plan and execute your own foodie series. We’ll discuss our experiences and offer alternatives to scale the program up or down based on the library setting. Come see what’s cookin’!

Going Beyond Headcounts - How To Use Project Outcome to Show the Tangible Results of Programming in My Library

Tammy Peasley, Black River Falls Public Library
Looking for a way to turn all your hard work (Inputs!) into information that your library, board and community can use? Wish you could say more about programs other than how many people attended (Outputs!)? The Public Library Association's FREE online toolkit, Project Outcome, is your solution! Learn how one small library is using Project Outcome to capture and demonstrate the community impact of its programming. This easy-to-use toolkit is designed to collect and analyze patron outcome data through simple surveys and ready-made reports and dashboards, helping turn better data into better libraries.

Google and Hathi Go Local

Nancy Mulhern, Wisconsin Historical Society
Digitizing local and state Wisconsin government information was the Wisconsin Historical Society’s focus during its participation in the second cooperative book scanning project between Google and UW-Madison. Learn how to access local planning documents, city council proceedings, county educational directories and county board proceedings via Google Book and Hathi Trust. Discussion will focus on how to efficiently utilize Hathi Trust and Google Book to fulfill your local history needs. Learn how to embrace the snippet and limited (search only) access as an aid to discovering not only what exists and where to find it, but also pinpointing the information you need within the resource.

Hands-On Program - Book Covers = Gift Bags, a Hands-on Experience!
La Crosse Center South Hall - Lower Level (Outside of Exhibit Hall)

Anne Swenson, UW-Stevens Point
This is a hands-on workshop. Our library doesn't process covers on our books. This is a way to utilize the very beautiful, colorful, unique book jackets that YOU can make! You will be able to choose a cover and make a bag in the 45-minute session. Need not be artistic, crafty or even color coordinated! Limit 20 participants.

It Begins with YOU: Maintaining a Professional Attitude in the Midst of Challenges

Jean Anderson, South Central Library System, Madison; Katherine Elchert, Rice Lake Public Library; Leah Langby, Indianhead Federated Library System, Eau Claire; Joleen Sterk, Menomonie Public Library
Challenging situations can happen anytime in the library - or anywhere. Jean Anderson, Leah Langby, Joleen Sterk, and Katherine Elchert are all certified in the Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) Prepare Training program. You’ll learn (and practice) a few tips and tricks to help navigate these situations with confidence. We’ll talk about how to use body language and nonverbal communication to relieve tension, maintaining a professional attitude when responding to a challenging situation, and more.

2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

All Together Now: Building a Great Library Team

Mary Garm, Lackawanna County Library System, Scranton, PA
Great things happen when your library team plays well together! Board members, Friends, and staff all have roles to play in making your team successful. Learn how to build your best team with good communication, trust, and respect.

Communicating the Value of Cataloging

Tina Marie Maes, Madison Public Library; Kathy Setter, Indianhead Federated Library System, Eau Claire; Melissa Shriver, Milwaukee Public Library
This is a panel presentation for catalogers about how catalogers can advocate for the value of cataloging within their library to non-cataloging library staff, directors, library board members, etc. We would touch on different ways to do this, including "elevator speeches," infographics, etc.

Curating Community Digital Collections: Collaborating to Build Digital Capacity

Emily Pfotenhauer, WiLS, Madison; Vicki Tobias, WiLS, Madison
The Curating Community Digital Collections (CCDC) initiative, sponsored by Recollection Wisconsin and supported by an IMLS Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant, offers graduate students in the iSchool at UW-Madison and the School of Information Studies (SOIS) at UW-Milwaukee hands-on experience in digital stewardship and digital preservation through summer fieldwork placements at small libraries, archives and museums across Wisconsin. In this panel, participating students, site supervisors and mentors will share their experiences and lessons learned from the Summer 2018 CCDC cohort.

HR for Non-HR Professionals

Emily Kornak, Lake Geneva Public Library; Angela Zimmermann, Mukwonago Community Library
People are an organization’s most important resource, but do you sometimes feel like you’re in a wind tunnel when dealing with HR? Perhaps you’ve recently transitioned to a new management role or feel that you don’t have the necessary HR experience for a (desired) position? Library directors have to understand best HR practices while also managing staff as effectively and empathetically as possible. Emily and Angie will share their experiences as library directors, covering topics including managing a multi-generational staff, staff engagement, managing up (managers, supervisors, library boards), while keeping perspective and maintaining that elusive work-life balance.

Inclusive Services Institute: Being Part of Positive Change

Martha Bauer, Brewer Public Library, Richland Center; Rene Bue, Hedberg Public Library, Janesville; Shauna Koszegi, Sun Prairie Public Library; Bobbie Kuehn, Brown County Library, Green Bay; Jessica MacPhail, Racine Public Library; Laurie Ollhoff, T.B. Scott Free Library, Merrill; Tessa Michaelson Schmidt, Public Library Development, Department of Public Instruction, Madison; Glenny Whitcomb, Chilton Public Library
Participants from the inaugural Inclusive Services Institute will share what motivated them to apply to participate and their experiences during the two intensive three-day conferences. Panelists will also share why they feel the Inclusive Services Institute and the tool they created are so important to all public libraries in Wisconsin.

Libraries and Legislators: Transforming Together!

Moderator: Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library; Speakers: Representative Mary Felzkowski, Joint Finance Committee; Representative Amy Loudenbeck, Joint Finance Committee; Steve Conway, WLA Government Relations Advisor
The panel will lead a discussion on the legislative funding process and how state funding creates value at the local level via local libraries. Those values include: supporting career and workforce development, providing access to technology and sustaining resources for life-long learning. This session supports WLA's relationship-building effort with legislators to recognize libraries as a value added essential in their communities.

No One Checked It Out: Transforming Perceptions of Diverse Books

Dawn Foster, Portage Public Library; Jenna Gilles-Turner, Chippewa Falls Public Library; Martha Kaempffer, Amery Public Library; Jessi Peterson, Chippewa Falls Public Library; Megan Schliesmann, Cooperative Children’s Book Center, Madison
You know it’s important to buy diverse books. But your community is small, your budget is small, and it’s hard to justify when they rarely leave the shelf. What can you do? Embrace your power as a role model! Incorporate diverse books in story times, displays, and other programming throughout the year. Make diversity visible and show it’s valued. Let your community see that diverse books aren’t about “the other” but about “us.” This session will feature a panel of practitioners using diverse books on a regular basis across their programming.

PLSR Project -- The Recommendation Report and Beyond

Martha Berninger, Resources for Libraries & Lifelong Learning, Department of Public Instruction, Madison; John DeBacher, Public Library Development, Department of Public Instruction, Madison; Kurt Kiefer, Assistant State Superintendent, Division for Libraries & Technology, Department of Public Instruction, Madison; John Thompson, Indianhead Federated Library System, Eau Claire
The PLSR recommendation report was presented to the Department of Public Instruction earlier this year. Join us for a brief wrap-up on the process and the recommendation report; plus to hear what happens next.
DPI staff members will share an update on the implementation road map and the possible paths to bringing equity and efficiencies to the services provided to Wisconsin's public libraries.

WLA Is for ALL Library Staff!

Jennifer Cook, Chippewa Valley Technical College, Eau Claire; Skip Mosshammer, Lakeshores Library System, Waterford; Nyama Reed, Whitefish Bay Public Library
You may wonder how you fit into WLA with all the talk about "librarians" if you don't have an MLIS. Did you know the VAST majority of library employees in Wisconsin do not have an MLIS degree? I bet you do know that all staff are vital and do awesome things for their communities! Attend this session to find out how WLA supports all library staff and how you can belong to our great community.

3:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

No Conflict Time in Exhibit Hall
La Crosse Center - South Hall

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

WLA Foundation Silent Auction: Check to see if you won your bid! If yes, pick up and pay for items!
La Crosse Center - South Hall


4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Friends 101: Starting, Growing and Sustaining a Successful Friends Organization

Carol Chapman, South Central Library System, Madison; John DeBacher, Public Library Development, Department of Public Instruction, Madison; Skip Mosshamer, Lakeshores Library System, Waterford; Bill Wilson, Milton Public Library and Arrowhead Library System
Everybody needs a friend, but starting, growing and sustaining a successful Friends of the Library organization can be complicated. Just like personal relationships, creating, nurturing, and maintaining mutually beneficial strong bonds of friendship requires attention. This interactive program will give attendees an opportunity to explore ways to “make new friends and keep the old ones!” Please attend if you’re a Friend or a Trustee and, if you’re a library director or staff member, please cone…and bring a Friend!

Funny, Tragic, Profound and Poignant—I Hated this Book

Matt Cashion, Author
What books do you and your book-loving patrons love and why? For whom do writers write? Why do writers write? Should we provide an imaginative escape from stress or an immersive experience into social problems? Should a book be a comfortable mirror or a challenging window? Why do some readers laugh where others cringe? Is it possible to entertain and enlighten? Can a book be all these things and still be popular? In this interactive session, I’ll read (briefly) from my own work, and invite discussion.

Low No Budget Storytime Props

Kristen Almo, Edgerton Public Library
Looking for ways to energize your Storytime or Preschool Dance Programs with low (ie. NO) budget? This session will send you back with loads of ideas you can use TODAY!

Notable Books Marathon

Jean Anderson, South Central Library System, Madison; Helene Androski, Retired, UW-Madison; Eliot Finkelstein, UW-Madison; Amy Lutzke, Dwight Foster Public Library, Fort Atkinson
Hosted by the READ section, the annual Notable Books Marathon features librarians from across the state discussing books from ALA's Notable Books list. In addition, the panel will highlight titles from the current WLA Literary Award Committee's list of Outstanding Achievement winners. Come and find more books to add to your TBR list!

Public Library Director Boot Camp REUNION

Shannon Schultz, Public Library Development, Department of Public Instruction, Madison
Since its inception in 2012, survivors of the New Public Library Director Boot Camp (held by DPI) have asked for a gathering at the WLA Conference. We have listened and here it is! Past boot camp participants and the general library public are welcome to attend this session, where we will share our experiences as new directors and have any new questions answered. Anyone new to the field or interested in public library administration will find this session very informative.

Re-envisioning Space: Collaboration, Creativity, and Strategic Partnerships to Drive Change

Kate Kramschuster, UW-Stout, Menomonie; Cory Mitchell, UW-Stout, Menomonie
Libraries need to Excite, Ignite and Invite or they may face extinction, or worse, irrelevance. The UW-Stout Library successfully transformed its space to be a student-focused destination on a shoe-string budget, by utilizing existing resources, collaborating across units, and forming strategic partnerships with the campus and local community. The linchpin of the project was a large weed of the physical Periodicals Collection. In the newly available space, we used the idea of "Creative Collaborative Collection Spaces" to showcase two of our most dynamic and popular collections, the Comics and Graphic Novels Collection, and the Educational Materials Center.

State of Craft Beer

Matthew Janzen, Author
Take a brewery tour of Wisconsin with State of Craft Beer Author & Photographer Matthew Janzen. Matthew’s presentation goes behind the scenes and beyond the taprooms, on the journey that led him to meet farmers, artists, scientists, virtually all walks of life and businesses that are benefiting from craft beer's astronomical growth. Even if you’re not a fan of craft beer, you will be captivated by the trends he discovered while driving over 30,000 miles to explore the economic impact of this booming industry. Learn how breweries are strengthening their communities, and how the importance of that story became a book.

What I Wish I Had Known Then: Lessons Learned as Managers/Leaders

Ryan Claringbole, Monona Public Library; Nathan Dowd, Edgewood College, Madison; Stef Morrill, WiLS, Madison; Tasha Saecker, Appleton Public Library
Moving into a management position provides many opportunities to learn about leadership, your organization, and yourself. Sometimes, the "opportunities" can feel overwhelming, and you just wish that someone would have told you some of this before you got into this position!
Our panel of leaders is here to help! Through a Q&A format, the panel will share what they wish they had known earlier in their careers about leadership, ranging from the practical to the philosophical.

Who's the Boss? Your Community!

Linda Gard, Cobb Public Library; Sarah Kyrie, Argyle Public Library; Gina Rae, Wilton Public Library
Sometimes we have a tendency to think we know what's best for our library. But is this really true? Join three civic minded librarians as we brainstorm with you better ways to serve our patrons and get out of the "It's my library!" mindset. Discover ways to make your work even more community-centered through programming, compassion, partnerships and tapping the potential of library users and non-users alike!!

5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Awards & Honors Reception
Radisson La Crosse Ballroom

This is your opportunity to personally thank and interact with our award winners.

Sponsored by EBSCO


5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Mingle over a Beer with Matt Janzen
Turtle Stack Brewery, 125 2nd Street South, La Crosse

Join State of Craft Beer author, Matt Janzen, at the Turtle Stack Brewery for continued conversation. The Turtle Stack Brewery is located across from the Radisson Hotel.

7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

WISL Membership Meeting and Social

Community for Open Wisconsin SIG Meeting - TBD