Programs - Friday

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Better Together FINAL

 


7:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Registration 
Potawatomi Hotel & Casino - Third Floor

 

7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast
Potawatomi Hotel & Casino - Serenity

 

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

BuJo (Bullet Journaling) for Beginners 
Track: Mix-It Up
Prosperity 

Gerri Moeller, Outagamie-Waupaca Library System, Appleton; Beth Carpenter, Kimberly-Little Chute Public Library, Kimberly
What do the Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg Businessweek and Buzzfeed have in common? They’ve all recently published articles on the bullet journal (BuJo for you hipsters out there), “an analog system for the digital age.” The bullet journal is a customizable and forgiving organization/planning system beloved by both presenters. It can be used by the artistic and the artistically challenged; we’ll have one of each! Learn how a BuJo can help you stay on track, reach your goals and maybe even bring out your creative side.

Duking it Out: Summer Learning vs. Summer Reading Programs
Track: Engaging People
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salons A/B 

Sonja Ackerman, Wausau; Leah Langby, Indianhead Federated Library System, Eau Claire; Sue Abrahamson, Waupaca Area Public Library
Discover how to create even more effective engagement with kids and families through transforming your approach to a traditional library staple: SRPs. A school media specialist, system youth consultant and front-line librarian will explore how to go beyond counting reading to engage your community in activities that create a literacy rich exploration experience. This session is perfect for directors and staff considering the possibility of enriching and enhancing kids summer experience with the library.

Library Instruction: A Key Ingredient in Librarianship or an Obligatory Practice
Track: Collaboration & Innovation
Clarity 

Ronald Edwards, Onalaska
Although prevalent since the nineteenth century, library instruction, bibliographic instruction, user education, library orientations or whatever you want to call it, remains a mainstay primarily in academic libraries, but public libraries as well.  The traditional 50-60 minute drill prompts a variety of feedback from students and other library users. This presentation will examine the pros and cons of library instruction, its connection to information literacy, and how it is perceived by its audience and others.  Whether it teaches library users to be better consumers or critical thinkers may in the end be less important than the public relations it enhances.

Practical Promotion for your Library (Handout)
Track: Advocacy & Promotion
Inspire 

Terra L. Fletcher, Shawano
Social media and smartphones have transformed our world. They’ve also altered the way we promote ourselves. Today, it takes the right combination of exposure, image and awareness to grow. But how can your library present an image? Terra will show you what it takes to present a professional, consistent and effective image online and off. She’ll explain how to evaluate your website’s visibility and improve your site’s ranking. She’ll let you in on the latest in the ever-changing world of social media and dispel common misconceptions while sharing industry best practices. You’ll learn how to really engage with your readers and make them advocates for your library.

Social Justice Programming and Your Library
Track: Leadership & Professional Development
Harmony 

Maria Cunningham, Milwaukee Public Library; Kristina Gomez, Milwaukee Public Library
The unbiased information and space provided by libraries often puts them at the forefront of social change. How can you provide your patrons with opportunities to connect, discuss, and enact change in their community? MPL librarians will present examples, resources, and best practices for developing social justice programming at your library. They will also share publicity strategies and community connections for libraries of all sizes. 

Technical Services: The Existential Angst of the Next Generation of Librarians
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salon C 

Bobby Bothmann, Minnesota State University-Mankato, Good Thunder 
In this talk, we will discuss how our work has changed from piece-by-piece order placement and description to the management of access to electronic resource packages and large sets of MARC records. We will look at what Technical Services means today and what it may mean in the near future as we adapt and re-envision ourselves and boldly go where no Technical Services librarians have gone before!

Water Science is Child's Play: STEM Kits for Public (and all) Libraries!
Track: Building Collections
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salons D/E 

Anne Moser, UW-Madison Wisconsin Water Library
In his books, Last Child in the Woods and The Nature Principle, journalist Richard Louv has written extensively about how young children develop either an affection for, or suffer from phobias of, the natural world.  He posits that the preschool and early elementary years offer a critical window to reach children with age-appropriate messages about ecosystems. Public libraries and programs like Head Start and early learning programs in 4K are natural places where these messages can be shared. Libraries especially have a unique role in engaging in and offering informal education on many topics, including many in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) related areas.  Wisconsin Water has some new tools to help. After several years offering water-themed story times to interested librarians and preschool teachers, the library has developed STEM Kits on a variety of water science theme that can be checked out and delivered using the Library Delivery Network. During the session, you will learn how to “Jump like a Frog!,” test for buoyancy, wear a blubber glove and learn to think like a scientist.

What's That Smell?  A Discussion of Vinegar Rot As it Affects Acetate Film
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Progress

Darcy Mohr, Racine Public Library; Rebecca Leannah, Racine Public Library; Joe Mills, Image Date Conversion (NA Publishing), Saline, MI
In 2015, the Racine Public Library discovered that 1200 rolls of microfilm were affected with vinegar syndrome. We will be discussing what vinegar syndrome is and how it affects acetate film.  The research performed by our archivist to determine the severity of the problem will be presented.  We will also discuss the various options we considered to preserve our local newspaper microfilm.  We will compare the costs and benefits of replacement vs. digitization.  We will be joined by a representative of NA Publishing, Ann Arbor, who will be available to discuss the technical aspects of replicating damaged film.

 

9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Collections and Services of the Wisconsin Historical Society Library Archives
Track: Engaging People 
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salon C 

Lori Bessler, Wisconsin Historical Society Library Archives, Madison
The Library Archives holds one of the top five genealogical collections in the United States and provides many services that will be of interest to librarians helping genealogists and local historians.  Lori will provide details on the variety of collections and descriptions of these services to inform librarians and archivists across the state about the ways the Library Archives can help them help others.

Develop Your Strategic Thinking Mindset or Else – The Future of Your Library Depends Upon It! (Handout)
Track: Leadership & Professional Development
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salons A/B 

Jeff Russell, Russell Consulting, Inc., Madison
Control your library’s destiny or somebody else will! That’s the challenge that library directors and staff at every level need to embrace. In this session, you’ll learn what strategic thinking is, how it differs from strategic planning, the role that strategic thinking plays in the long-term success of your library and the qualities that enable you to become a strategic thinker. You will learn how to develop these skills in yourself and your staff.

Engage and Discover: Building a Digital Repository
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Prosperity 

Kris Turner, UW-Madison Law School Library
Libraries provide users with a place to learn about their local history or research archival material about their institution. Learn how to connect with your users by building a digital repository that celebrates your community's history and emphasizes the importance of your library. Discover how one library brought together photos, oral histories, newsletters and other diverse content, built a repository from the ground up, and worked with their patrons to create a free repository that cements the community's legacy and the library's critical place in that community. Celebrate WLA's anniversary with AWSL by preserving and sharing your history with a digital repository!

Learning the Ropes: Establishing an "Art in the Library" Program at Your University
Track: Collaboration & Innovation
Clarity 

Paige Barreto, UW-Parkside, Kenosha; Melissa Olson, UW-Parkside, Kenosha
Looking for an easy, cost-effective way to update your library’s style, display visual collections and create long-term partnerships?  An “Art in the Library” program may be just the solution! In this fun and informative session, co-chairs of this university library’s art program will help you discover the benefits of bringing art to your academic library.  Learn how to partner with your campus and community, attract new audiences to your space and spice up your study areas!

One Conference One Book Discussion
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Harmony 

Jennifer Morales, Author; Katharine Clark, E.D. Locke Public Library, McFarland
Join us to chat about Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories by Jennifer Morales, this year's One Book, One Conference title. This will be an informal discussion and anyone that has read the book is invited.

The Power of the Teen Voice
Track: Building Collections
Inspire 

Melissa Gorzelanczyk, Green Bay; Liza Wiemer, Milwaukee
Wisconsin authors Melissa Gorzelanczyk (Arrows) and Liza Wiemer (Hello?) will share how YA novels provide an outlet to explore topics such as diversity, family dynamics, relationships, sexuality, coping with loss and grief, both through fantasy and contemporary fiction. The two authors will give librarians specific tools to help readers discover new books based on key words and interests.

The Right to Rehabilitation: How Prison Libraries Serve the Community
Track: Mix-It Up
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salon F 

Teresa Wetzel, Columbia Correctional Institution, Portage; Sara Gilles, Department of Corrections, Wisconsin Secure Program Facility, Boscobel 
Prison librarians work to serve a population who, while having lost many rights, still has the right to read, study and the ability to work toward rehabilitation. The presenters will address some of the challenges of prison librarianship and how they can be overcome.
 

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

A Librarian in the Lab: Data Management Needs and Best Practices in the Academic Research Environment
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salons D/E 

Lisa Abler, UW-Madison
Grant applications increasingly require attention to data management. Initiatives like NIH’s Rigor and Reproducibility expand data reporting from information collected to aspects of research like materials and methods. How can librarians help researchers meet funder requirements in grant applications and the lab? Hear from a scientist cum librarian about how researchers interact with data, data management best practices and how good data management can improve data accessibility for the lab and the research community.

Become Your Own Outreach Specialist
Track: Engaging People
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salons A/B 

Mollie Beaumont, Indianapolis Public Library, Indianapolis, IN
We're busy. Who has time for outreach? When you reach out to patrons in the library, chances are you're doing some sort of outreach. Patrons will become more engaged with what your library provides when you reach out to them. Also, you will learn strategies to become a better outreach librarian within your library.

Data-Stalking Our Library Learners: Tutortrac and Information Literacy
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Harmony 

Julie Gores, Madison College; Cristina Springfield, Madison College
It has become common for college and university administrators to ask librarians to provide measurements of their impact on student retention and success. In the fall of 2014, Madison College libraries took on a new project to do just that. As a result of reorganization that created a new center, Libraries & Academic Support Services, Madison College librarians began collaborative partnerships with other units that provided opportunity for new initiatives.  As a result, librarians began a quantitative assessment project to track the measurable impact of information literacy sessions on student retention and success using a software traditionally used in academic support centers: Tutortrac. This presentation will cover the implementation of the project, outcomes, lessons learned, how the data has been used for planning and promotion of information literacy sessions and what the future looks like.  It’s time to start thinking out of the box!

Library as Youth Art Gallery
Track: Collaboration & Innovation
Inspire 

Sarah Cournoyer, Beaver Dam Public Library; Nicole Ozanich, Portage County Public Library, Stevens Point; Alison Wirth, Portage County Public Library, Stevens Point; Kerry Pinkner, Waukesha Public Library
Celebrating libraries as a place to make and be inspired, librarians around Wisconsin are providing space for youth art exhibits year round, as well as in March during Youth Art Month. Join panelists who currently host these galleries to find out what a gallery or exhibit entails - from making connections with art teachers, to coordinating space and publicity, tapping into local talent, bringing in homeschoolers and coordinating programming to complement these galleries.

Research That's More Than Skin Deep: Putting the Fringes of Society at the Center of Your Research
Track: Mix-It Up
Woodland Dreams Ballroom - Salon F

Amelia Osterud, Milwaukee Public Library
Join Wisconsin author and MPL librarian Amelia Klem Osterud to hear about the research that went into her book, The Tattooed Lady: A History. From the archives of the Circus World Museum to Harvard's Hougton Library, with lengthy stops in the land of online genealogy and Ancestry.com, hear how she pieced together the biographies of the performing tattooed ladies of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Senior Moments! Outreach and Programming
Track: Advocacy & Promotion
Clarity 

Maureen Birchfield, Hedberg Public Library, Janesville; Rene Bue, Hedberg Public Library, Janesville
Learn how you can provide programming to seniors inside and outside of the library.  Ideas and resources will be shared so that you can offer programming that is fun for the participants and for the programmers.  The activities shared will be especially useful for sparking discussions about memories.

Workshop to Writers: How to Grow a Teen/Tween Writing group
Track: Building Collections
Prosperity 

Jenni Frencham, Columbus Public Library; Valerie Biel, Randolph
Learn how to encourage the next generation of great writers in your own community. Through an initial Teen/Tween Writing Workshop led by a local author, The Columbus Public Library has created an active monthly writing group where teens and tweens share their stories and encouragement while improving their creative writing skills.
 

11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

President's Luncheon: An Afternoon with Jane Hamilton
Potawatomi Hotel & Casino - Serenity 

(Decription to follow)