Programs - Wednesday

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Check out the WLA Conference At a Glance for a quick overview of activities and programs throughout the conference

7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Registration  
Kalahari Conference Center – North Atrium

 

7:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Silent Auction & Crafty gift Fair Drop-Off
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall 

 

7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. 

Continental Breakfast
Kalahari Convention Center - South Atrium 

 

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Past Presidents’ Breakfast
Empress

Technical Services Section Membership Meeting
Tamboti
 

8:45 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Keynote Address:  Reclaiming Main Street
Convention A/B/G/H  

Harwood Smaller

Rich Harwood is founder and president of The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, a national nonprofit organization that helps people and organizations address community challenges, improve their own effectiveness, and do their work in a way that makes communities stronger. For months now, Rich has been traveling to cities and towns across the country as part of his nationwide Reclaiming Main Street Campaign to help people address the acrimony and divisiveness that have taken hold of our politics and public life, and get back to the notion that community is a common enterprise. 

Harwood will focus on the potential for libraries to strengthen their role in communities and civic life during his discussion at the conference. This session will give members from all types of libraries the opportunity to consider the implications for their work as agents of democracy. The Harwood Institute is currently partnering with the ALA on its Libraries Transforming Communities initiative that seeks to strengthen librarians’ roles as core community leaders and change-agents. This initiative addresses a critical need within the library field by developing and distributing new tools, resources, and support for librarians to engage with their communities in new ways.

 

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Activities in the Exhibits Hall
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Makerspace...stop by to play, experiment and make with your WLA makerspace coordinators!

Make a Video Game with Paper and an iPad
Make a game with graph paper, an iPad (provided or use your own) and the PixelPress Floors app

Cereal Box Book Making
Make a hand-stitched notebook out of a cereal box

Squishy Circuits
Learn to teach electronics without soldering or wires with homemade conductive dough

WLA Foundation Silent Auction and Crafty Gift Fair
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Your chance to bid on the many donated items, including artwork, tasty food, valuable services and more, while benefiting the WLA Foundation! All bids close at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday.
 

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Grand Opening and No Conflict Time in Exhibit Hall
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Join us for the grand opening of the Exhibit Hall and visit our many new and returning vendors.

Engage Stage
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Wiscon-Sing 
David H.B. Drake, Organic Arts,Milwaukee
Wiscon-Sing has been seen throughout our state as a sing-along song and slide portrait of the state of Wisconsin.  The program presents songs that introduce Wisconsin from the original inhabitants through the European immigratin up to our present day farmers an Great Lakes sailors.

David plays a variety of handmade and historic instruments, including Indian Courting Flute, Mountain Banjo, Dulcimer and Concertina, in addition to Guitar.
 

11:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Engage Stage
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

BadgerLink's College, Career, Health & Computer Skills Resource Demo 
Kara Ripley, Department of Public Instruction, Madison
Familiar with BadgerLink but need a refresher? Or new to the field and want to learn more? Highlighting just a few of our trusted resources, see how you can help patrons advance their careers with popular software and computer skills training modules; teach students how to get ahead with GED, ACT and ASVAB practice tests; and improve the well-being of your community with accurate health information.  Walk away with the knowledge and tools you need! 


11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

ALS' Mobile Makerspace: Bringing Makerspaces to Our Libraries
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Cypress 

Melody Clair, Automated System Administrator, Arrowhead Library System, Janesville; Laura Damon-Moore, Assistant Director, Eager Free Public Library, Evansville
Through an LSTA grant, Arrowhead Library System created a mobile makerspace for use by ALS libraries to provide access to materials, equipment, software and space that ALS patrons would otherwise not be able to use or purchase on their own. This presentation will show how we created, schedule and share the makerspace with our libraries as well as how some of our libraries use and integrate the equipment.

Book Festivals Spark Community Engagement
Track: Engaging People
Mangrove 

Tana Elias, Digital Services & Marketing Manager, Madison Public Library; Conor Moran, Wisconsin Book Festival Director, Madison Public Library
Libraries big and small are using book festival events as a way to connect to their core audience of readers. Join Madison Public Library as they share lessons learned from their first two years of organizing the Wisconsin Book Festival.

Front Line Challenges: Materials, Privacy and Policy
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Tamarind 

Sarah Cournoyer, Assistant Director and Children's Librarian, Horicon Public Library; Dawn Haggerty, Librarian, Herzing University, Kenosha
Whether in public or academic libraries, challenges to intellectual freedom take many forms.  This panel discussion will focus on privacy, censorship, collection management, gifts, reference transactions and electronic storage, labeling, materials challenges and academic freedom on campus.  Panelists will share best practices, research on current issues and policy examples with ample time for discussion.

The Neurodiverse Library: Preventing Sensory Overload
Track: Mix-It-Up
Portia 

Nicole Jenks May, Ph.D. student, UW-Milwaukee SOIS
Students who have autism, ADHD, sensory processing disorders and other challenges may struggle with the modern library concept. As libraries become more hands-on places to learn and to have fun, they pose new challenges to those for whom extra sights, sounds and smells can be distractions. While collaboration tables, coffee shops and playrooms are welcoming to the average patron, they are often located in high traffic areas and cause challenges to other patrons who just want to come to study or pick up a few books. Someone with a sensory processing disorder or ADHD must walk through a virtual minefield of sights, sounds and smells to get to the quiet study spaces located somewhere in the library. This presentation will help you learn some Neurodiverse lingo and ways to make your easily overwhelmed patrons feel at home and even love your library, addressing steps all libraries can take whether they serve primarily children, adults or the public at large.

Partnerships for Success in Summer Reading
Track: Advocacy & Promotion
Aloeswood 

Krissy Wick, Youth Services Librarian, Madison Public Library
Do you want your Summer Reading Program to reach kids beyond traditional library users? Do you want to get the word out to your community about the power of summer reading? And do you need to find money to do it? Find out how Madison Public Library is tackling all of these issues and learn about their Group Summer Reading Club, their new pilot program: Read Up! at the Madison Public Library and the grants that made it all happen.

Thrown to the Wolves: Building Trust, Encouraging Independence & Creating an Unstoppable Team
Track: Leadership/Professional Development
Guava 

Kati Tvaruzka, Head of Access Services, UW-Eau Claire McIntyre Library
Leadership isn't always what you know, but how you successfully communicate with and advocate for your employees. The presenter, a reference librarian who was appointed Head of Access Services (Circulation, Interlibrary Loan/Universal Borrowing, Stacks Maintenance and Student Equipment Checkout) in 2011, will share how communication, humility, participation, advocacy and trust helped lessen employee skepticism, allowing for realignment of services and priorities, all while building a strong team.

Understanding Your Preservation Needs: An Introduction to the Preservation Self-Assessment Tool
Marula 

Sarah Hopley, Grant Coordinator Connecting to Collections, Wisconsin Historical Society Library-Archives, Madison
This program provides an introduction to the newly-created IMLS- funded Wisconsin Connecting to Collections preservation self-assessment tool. This presentation will guide you through using the self-assessment tool in order to review the preservation conditions in your institution and determine critical preservation needs. We will also discuss how to make improvements and acquire project funding. The self-assessment tool is simple, self-paced, and is pertinent to all types of libraries. 

We Are All Special Librarians! What Public and Academic Librarians Have in Common with Special Librarians
Track: Collaborations & Innovations
Aralia 

Kris Turner, Reference and Technology Services Librarian, UW-Madison;  Jennifer Edmonds, Knowedge and Resource Manager, ERDMAN, Madison
Many librarians who end up in special libraries do not intend on working there. These accidental librarians often start in the public or academic realm and transition to law, business, medical or another special library. How can these special librarians help you? Find out what topics special librarians can help with, ranging from tricky legal questions to business operations to a medical question with this panel discussion.


11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Career Center
Sponsored by UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, WLA
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Resume Review Drop Off
Looking for a first job or applying for a new position and would like a second opinion of your resume? Drop it by the Career Center and have it reviewed by a librarian.  Come back to the Career Center between 4:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to meet up and chat about it.
 

11:25 a.m. - 11:45 p.m.

Engage Stage
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

An Overview of EBSCO eBooks
Paula Brewster, EBSCO 
Maximize your library's eBooks collection! Come learn how EBSCO eBooks offers hundreds of thousands of high-quality eBook and Audiobook titles from leading publishers.  You can select individual titles, subject sets or featured collections.  Also, learn more about our free EBSCOhost© Collection Manager (ECM) service. ECM is a powerful tool that helps you acquire eBooks and Audiobooks that can be delivered on the EBSCOhost© platform.
 

11:45 a.m. - 2:05 p.m.

Engage Stage
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Wisconsin's Patent & Trademark Resource Centers
Kristina Gomez, Milwaukee Public Library
 

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Association of Wisconsin Special Librarians (AWSL) Business Meeting
Wisconsin Brew Pub - Skybox


YSS Luncheon:  Teen Librarian Toolbox 
Convention A/H 

karenjensenKaren Jensen, Creator and Administrator, Teen Librarian Toolbox; Youth Services Librarian, Betty Warmack Branch Library, Grand Prairie, TX
Karen will be speaking about the importance and value of teens in libraries, her work with Teen Librarian Toolbox as well as the #SVYALit Project, which uses young adult literature to talk with teens about sexual violence and consent.

 

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Broadening Your Patron Base 
Track: Collaborations & Innovations
Aralia 

Marc Boucher, Director, UW-Baraboo/Sauk County Library; Meg Allen, Director, Baraboo Public Library; Katrina Collins, Youth Services Manager, Neenah Public Library
Discover how you can broaden your patron base by seeking partnerships with organizations in your community. Marc and Meg will discuss their collaboration on an integrated library card, with which library cardholders are given borrowing privileges for both locations and their respective library systems with a single card as well as the benefits of cooperative  outreach programming. Katrina will discuss her partnerships with the local high school, food pantry and community organizations as she seeks to connect with a previously hidden patron population.

Creating School / Public Library Partnerships Within Your Community: Second Chance Book Club for High School Reluctant Readers
Track: Advocacy & Promotion
Aloeswood 

Toni Streckert, Information Coordinator, Monona Public Library; Rebecca Fox-Blair, Executive Director and Teacher, Monona Grove Liberal Arts Charter School for the 21st Century
Since 2010, Monona Grove Liberal Arts Charter School for the 21st Century and the Monona Public Library have collaborated on a book club for reluctant teen readers. The MG21 school is designed to meet the needs of students in danger of not graduating. The book club has strengthened the students’ love of reading and their connection to the public library and offered additional collaboration. Establishing and sustaining the partnership, funding and a Q & A with a panel of past and current student book club participants will be featured.

Internal Conflicts in Public Library Adult Literacy Programs 
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Tamarind 

Rachel Wedeward, Graduate Student, Waterloo, WI
Adult literacy programs and public libraries go hand in hand. The mission of many public libraries is to provide lifelong learning by creating more able learners and researchers, while adult literacy programs strive to create accessible, quality instruction that develops life, work and literacy skills. In order for an adult literacy program to be successful in a public library, the program must be based in the institutionalization of public libraries by integrating the mission, goals and programs of the library. Adult literacy programs in public libraries can be improved by addressing confidentiality issues and implementing social service programs as part of creating flexibility within the program and creating applicable policies that will meet the needs of both the adult literacy program and the public library.

Navigating the Wisconsin Administrative Code Online
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Mangrove 

Bruce Hoesly, Senior Revising Attorney, Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau, Madison
Beginning in January 2015 the Wisconsin Administrative Code will no longer be issued in print. This program will demonstrate how to use the electronic version of the code.

Notable Books Marathon
Track: Building Collections
Cypress

Helene Androski, Retired UW-Madison Librarian; Jean Anderson, Continuing Education Consultant, South Central Library System, Madison; Eliot Finkelstein, Academic Librarian, UW-Madison College Library; Kirsten Houtman, Librarian, Madison
The annual Notable Books Marathon is once again hosted by the READ Section. Librarians from across the state will be discussing books from ALA's Notable Books List as well as titles from the current WLA Literary Awards Committee’s list of Outstanding Achievement winners. This will be a fun and fast-paced program!

Saving Your Nos
Track: Mix-It-Up
Portia 

Darla Allen, Librarian, Charles and JoAnn Lester Library, Nekoosa
The Library is filled with a lot of rules....no food, no loud talking, no checking out books if you have fines. Finding the "yes" in daily situations can be difficult to identify. This session will focus on how small libraries were able to build community relationships, connect generations and turn our libraries into the community living room all by finding the "yes" in sometimes surprising situations.

Shake it Up! Best Outside-the-Box School-Age Programs
Track: Engaging People
Marula 

Terry Ehle, Youth Services Coordinator, Lester Public Library, Two Rivers; Cate Levinson, KidSpace Librarian, Niles Public Library District, Niles, IL; Cole Zrostlik, Youth Services Librarian, St. Croix Public Library
Feeling less-than-energized by your school-age offerings? Shake up your community and your creativity with great ideas you can use immediately! From Armchair astronomy to Banana Pianos, from Swiffer Shuffleboard to Nonfiction Explosions, these elementary programs from all sizes of libraries will leave your kid patrons clamoring for more. Return to your library with an armful of elementary ideas that pack a big punch, and come prepared to share!

Transform Your Career
Track: Leadership/Professional Development
Guava 

Leah Ujda, Research Specialist, Design Concepts, Madison; Jessica Hutchings, Learning Technology Consultant, UW-Milwaukee; Erin Hoag, Local Treasures Manager, Madison Children's Museum
Not all librarians end up working in libraries. In this panel discussion, three degreed librarians who work in non-traditional settings will share what they do, why they were interested in their work and how their skills as librarians are assets in these positions.


2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Career Center
Sponsored by UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, WLA
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

How To Do a Skype Interview
Don't let this type of interview intimidate...get tips and tricks from fellow librarians who have survived this type of hiring conversation. Laptops and headsets will be on hand for some live demos of how to be a successful Skype candidate.
 

2:10 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Engage Stage
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

ProQuest Research Companion
Ed McCullough, ProQuest 


2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Caldecott Crash Course: Evaluation of the Art in Picture Books
Track: Building Collections
Marula 

Gail Nordstrom, Public Library Consultant, Viking Library System, Fergus Falls, MN; Heidi Hammond, Assistant Professor/SLMS Coordinator, Master of Library and Information Science Program, St. Catherine University, St. Paul, MN 
Two 2011 Caldecott Committee members will describe how the most distinguished picture book for children is chosen. Participants will see how the duo evaluates the art in picture books using recent award books, then apply their newfound skills in groups to evaluate possible 2015 Caldecott contenders. The program will transform the way that participants present picture books to children and provide tools to help them connect children more effectively to picture books through the illustrations.

Collaborative Negotiation: When Relationships Are as Important as Solutions
Track: Collaborations & Innovations
Aralia 

Bruce Smith, Community Liaison & Service Specialist, WiLS, Madison
How do you get from thinking it would be great to collaborate on a project with another library or community partner to forming a working agreement that all parties feel is fair? The collaborative approach to negotiation seeks to convert individual wants into a single problem and to bring all parties together to work on solving this problem. Learn about processes that can bring about both transparency and trust when you negotiate to collaborate.

Design It! Developing a Graphic Design Process for Diversity Resources
Track: Advocacy & Promotion
Aloeswood 

Miguel Ruiz, Resident Librarian, UW-Madison College and Steenbock Libraries
Providing successful library services require effective communication with users, therefore, it is important that content creators who develop visual materials understand key components of design and, specifically, develop a holistic graphic design process.  In many cases, this process is an integral component of the library's broader marketing and diversity plans and serves as a reflection of the values of a library institution.  This session outlines the design planning and development process for creating visual content, including best practices, identifying message and audience, developing form and function, and methods of production.

Developmentally Age-Appropriate Storytimes
Track: Mix-It-Up
Portia 

Ashley Thiem-Menning, Youth Services Librarian, Kaukauna Public Library
Libraries today often bundle their youngsters into storytime groups such as "birth to two years old" or have one generic "preschool" storytime.  What we sometimes fail to remember in times of limited funds and limited staffing is that we may be failing to meet children's developmental needs in these bundled storytimes.  Brain studies consistently reveal the importance of the first two years of life, even referring to the period as "critical."  As literacy professionals, it is necessary to offer a program that is developmentally accurate, not only as a teaching tool, but to be certain that families are not turned off by a program that is either too far below or above their child's developmental abilities.  This program will teach you how to format a baby/pre-walker program, a one-year-old program, a two-year-old program and how you can still "bundle" a storytime for all ages.

Dispel the Myths, Part 1: Unlock the Keys to Staff Motivation
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Tamarind

Brian Simons, Director, Verona Public Library; Laura V. Page, Management Consultant, Library Development Resource Alliance, Madison
We know a motivated and engaged staff is critically important, but we have little discretionary money for carrots and we know sticks don’t work. So what’s a Library Leader to do? Come to this interactive and content-rich session where three expert guides will dispel the myths of motivation and show you what works by focusing on the three proven keys. Gain practical steps, tools and techniques you can successfully use in your setting.

GeoData at UW-Madison: Online Access to GIS Data Using OpenGeoportal
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Mangrove 

Jaime Stoltenberg, Map and Geospatial Data Librarian, UW-Madison Arthur H. Robinson Map Library; Rebecca Lin, Student Assistant, UW-Madison Arthur H. Robinson Map Library
The method for disseminating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data for educational use on the UW-Madison campus has recently been updated to enhance efficiency. Since 2005 the Robinson Map Library has been archiving Wisconsin geospatial data for use in research and teaching, resulting in nearly one terabyte of data accessible to students and researchers. With demand steadily increasing, manually handling individual data requests is an unsustainable service model. In a collaborative effort between the State Cartographer's Office and the Robinson Map Library, we have implemented OpenGeoportal as an online solution for more efficient data sharing. In this presentation we will share the details of the project, including: authoring metadata for Wisconsin datasets, how OpenGeoportal works and future plans for expanding the data archive.

Homegrown Leadership for Youth Services Librarians: Cultivating Your Inner Leader
Track: Leadership/Professional Development
Guava 

Shawn Brommer, Youth Services & Outreach Consultant, South Central Library System, Madison; Laura Damon-Moore, Assistant Director, Eager Free Public Library, Evansville; Marge Loch-Wouters, Youth Services Coordinator, La Crosse Public Library 
From establishing seminal outreach programs to creating the first statewide summer library program, Wisconsin’s youth services librarians are long recognized as passionate leaders. Innovation requires reflection and in this session youth services librarians from diverse regions and career stages will discuss ways to nurture personal leadership, embrace opportunities and create professional networks. Together we’ll sow the seeds of professional development and become leadership stewards - let’s look beyond making moments and focus on making differences.

Making It Real
Track: Engaging People
Cypress 

rebeccabehrens-1Rebecca Behrens, Author; Gayle Rosengren, Author
Two Wisconsin authors of middle grade historical fiction will suggest ways for libraries to help educators and parents bring history to life as they prepare students to meet Common Core standards. The use of fiction to make history personal is the first step. Learn why and hear creative suggestions that build on and supplement this premise. 

Gayle Rosengren

Book signing immediately following program:
When Audrey Met Alice, Rebecca Behrens                                                 
  


What the Moon Said, Gayle Rosengren


2:45 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Engage Stage 
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Digital Public Library of America
Amy Rudersdorf, Digital Public Library of America 
 

3:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

No Conflict Time in Exhibit Hall
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Engage Stage 
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Speed Networking with the WLA Career Center
Are you new to librarianship? Or just want to cultivate new relationships with your peers? Join us for a fast-paced, fun-filled session where you can meet librarians from across the state and find colleagues who share your interests.  Have one-on-one conversations with your peers for five minutes at a time, but when the timer dings, it's time to move on. 
 

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Career Center
Sponsored by UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, WLA
Kalahari Convention Center - Exhibit Hall

Resume Pick-Up and Discussions 


4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Choose Your Future: Strategic Planning Makes It Happen
Track: Mix-It-Up
Portia 

Paula Ganyard, Director, UW-Green Bay Cofrin Library; Ewa Barczyk, Director of Libraries, UW-Milwaukee; Valerie Malzacher, Director, UW-River Falls Chalmer Davee Library; Jean Zanoni, Associate Dean, Marquette University Libraries, Milwaukee
As libraries respond to changes in the information landscape, strategic planning is key to redefining their role. This session will explore the strategic planning process including conducting an environment scan, developing a vision statement, setting strategic initiatives and putting the plan into action while involving staff and engaging stakeholders along the way. Join a panel of academic library strategists who will share their unique experiences and get ready to choose your library’s future.

Dispel the Myths, Part 2: The Three Keys to Meaningful Staff Motivation & Engagement: Purpose - Mastery - Autonomy
Track: Leadership/Professional Development
Tamarind 

Brian Simons, Director, Verona Public Library; Laura V. Page, Management Consultant, Library Development Resource Alliance, Madison
Building on the foundation laid in Part 1, gain practical steps, tools, techniques and resources you can successfully use to motivate staff in your library. Attendance to Part 1 is recommended but not required. This is not a panel discussion, but rather a fast-paced and interactive session with the goal of helping attendees learn what really works to increase employee engagement.

Free and Affordable Apps for Accessibility
Track: Mix-It-Up (Handouts 1 and 2)
Aloeswood 

Rhonda Gould, Gould Library Consulting, Tacoma, WA; Nancy Fletcher, Sageweaver Consulting, Milwaukee
Library personnel are the greatest resource in providing outreach services to those with special needs or underserved populations. Free and low cost applications for smart phones and tablets have gone beyond simply games and utility functions and can be used to increase accessibility for library patrons of all ages. These apps and how to implement them in the library's existing outreach resources will be discussed and demonstrated, and a go-to list of additional resources will be provided.

Good Girls, Bad Girls, Real Girls: Teen Girls in YA Lit & in Your Library
Track: Engaging People
Marula 

Kelly Jensen, Associate Editor and Community Manager at Book Riot; Carrie Mesrobian, Writer/Author, Columbia Heights, MN
Everyone's a critic when it comes to girls in YA fiction. Girls are either good or bad, likable or unlikable, heroines or damsels. These divisive terms do disservice to YA fiction and its readers. This session will discuss girl characters in YA fiction and the tough issues they face, reader responses to their depiction, and where and how today’s teens shape their perspectives and expectations of girls both in the books they read and beyond.

Book signing immediately following program:  Sex and Violence: a Novel, Carrie Mesrobian

Libraries Transforming Communities: The Columbus Public Library Experience So Far
Track: Collaborations & Innovations
Aralia 

Cindy Fesemyer, Director, Columbus Public Library; Katrina Dombrowsky, Youth Services Librarian, Columbus Public Library; Bruce Smith, Community Liaison & Service Specialist, WiLS, Madison; Shawn Brommer, Youth Services & Outreach Consultant, South Central Library System, Madison; Mary Lou Sharpee, Library Board of Trustees, Columbus Public Library
The Columbus Public Library is transforming its community based on the principles taught by the Harwood Institute. As one of ten recipients nationally of the ALA Libraries Transforming Communities grant, the Columbus team is being trained to turn outward to better reflect the true needs of the community. This panel discussion will be a Wisconsin-specific continuation of the Rich Harwood keynote address and will showcase ideas you can try in your library.

Literary Awards Winner
Track: Building Collections
Cypress 

larrywatson-1Larry Watson, Author 

The Wisconsin Library Association has chosen Let Him Go by Larry Watson, who taught at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point for 25 years before joining the faculty at Marquette University, as the winner of the 2014 Wisconsin Library Association Literary Award, given for the highest literary achievement by a Wisconsin author for a book published in 2013.

Book signing immediately following program: Let Him Go; Montana 1948; Orchard 

Pointing the Way: Making Signage in Your Library Clear, Concise and Useful
Track: Library Issues & Challenges
Guava 

Kris Turner, Reference and Technology Services Librarian, UW-Madison; Liz Zimdars, Public Services Librarian, Sun Prairie Public Library
One of the many challenges libraries face is disseminating information to its users. Once they are in the building, where do they go? What services do we offer and what resources are here? Creating signage can help make the library environment less stressful, more positive and perhaps even a little more fun. Join AWSL as we explore great (and not-so-great) signage.

What About Privacy Literacy? Libraries and Privacy Education in the Digital Age
Track: Technology & Digital Services
Mangrove 

Jim Jonas, Information and Instructional Services Librarian, UW-Madison MERIT
Librarians provide needed instruction for users navigating the increasingly-complex information environment. Yet we could be doing more to inform public notions of privacy. Our society remains full of threats to personal privacy as well as opportunities to leverage shared information. Whether the topic is Facebook, Google, Amazon or the NSA, people need help protecting and using their personal information. This presentation will discuss privacy literacy and examine a model for teaching "Personal Privacy in the Digital Age."


5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

WLA/WLAF Annual Business Meeting
Guava


5:45 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

Association of Wisconsin Special Librarians (AWSL) Social
Ivory Coast 

 

6:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

Wisconsin Small Libraries Section (WISL) Board Meeting
Portia 


6:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Wisconsin Small Libraries Section (WISL) Business Meeting
Portia 


6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Banned Books Read-In
Tamboti 

Kristina Gomez, Librarian, Milwaukee Public Library
Hang out with fellow intellectual freedom fighters and read some of your favorite banned books at this informal read-in.


UW-Madison SLIS Alumni Reunion
Wisteria 

UW-Milwaukee SOIS Alumni Reunion
Suite E

 

7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Cards Against Librarianship
Portia 

Sherry Machones, Director, Edgerton Public Library
This get-together will pit librarians against each other in a battle to create the most outrageous sentences with cards related to libraries and librarianship.

 

8:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

vo5WLA Foundation Fundraiser: BOOKGIE NIGHTS Gotta Have The Funk!
Convention A/B/G/H 

Join the area’s favorite live cover band, VO5, for a fun night of dancing to the hits of 70s & 80s. We’ll take you back to when librarians wore platform shoes while programming with punch cards, and at the same time you’ll be making a pain-free contribution to the Foundation. 

Photo Credit: Paula A. White