Thursday, October 22, 2009

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Thursday, October 22, 2009

It's Like Magic:  A shortcut to check out Wednesday again!

 

7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

♦ Registration

    Radisson Paper Valley Hotel Pool Dome Area

 

7:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

♦ Hot Breakfast Buffet

    Empire

 

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

♦ Intellectual Freedom Round Table Meeting

    Hickory

 

♦ Library Research Round Table Meeting  

    Linden/Rosewood

♦ New Member Round Table Meeting

    Oaktag/Parchment

♦ Reference and Adult Services Section Meeting  

    Crown/Bond

♦ Technical Services Section Meeting  

     Lawrence

♦ Wisconsin Library Association Foundation Board Meeting  

     Redwood

♦ Wisconsin Library Trustees and Friends Meeting

    Cortland

 

 

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

♦ Exhibits

    Grand Ballroom

  

♦ WLA Foundation Silent Auction -- pay and pick up at 3:30 p.m.

    Briarwood

Bid on items to benefit the Campaign for Wisconsin Libraries, such as art works, collectibles, antiques and much more.

 

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

♦ Internet Caf/strong>

    Executive Boardroom

  

8:45 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

♦ Bill & Melinda Gates Foundations PC Grant Program

    Hickory

 

Bob Bocher, Technology Consultant, Division for Libraries, Technology, and Community Learning; John DeBacher, Public Library Consultant, Division for Libraries, Technology, and Community Learning

Bob Bocher and John DeBacher will update recipients of the Gates Foundations online opportunity hardware grant program.  This program is for libraries that have already been selected to apply for the grants.  Staffs of library systems assisting in implementation of the grant program for their member libraries are also invited.  

 

♦ Collection Development and Resource Sharing: Confronting Problems    

    While Creating Greater Access

    Cortland

 

Eric Robinson, Academic Librarian, WiLS; Heather Weltin, Academic Librarian, Memorial Library, UW-Madison; Beth Price, Interlibrary Loan, Madison Public Library; Sarah Hartman, Adult Services Librarian, Middleton Public Library; Lee Konrad, Director, Memorial Library, UW-Madison  

This panel discussion of academic and public librarians in resource sharing and collection development will share their thoughts on collaborating between the two areas.  Discussion topics will include: the acceleration and transition from print to electronic collections, the expansion of library partnerships and redefinition of the library marketplace for the licensing of electronic resources, trends of interlibrary loan supplementing an institutions own collection, effects of decreasing collection budgets and evolving patron expectations toward immediate material access.

 

♦ Difficult Conversations: Conducting a Difficult Conversation When the

    Stakes Are High and Emotions Are Strong

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

Jeffrey Russell, Co-Director, Russell Consulting, Inc.
Telling someone uncomfortable truths is difficult. Sometimes, because you dont want to start an argument or you dont want to hurt someones feelings, its easier to let things go. Unfortunately, this is often the worst strategy. In this workshop, youll learn how to speak honestly without sugar-coating and without the other person getting defensive. Youll learn tools for telling simple truths in a respectful way and leave with a plan for having a difficult conversation.

 

♦ Flavor of Wisconsin: History and Culture Through Recipes

    Aspen

 

thursdaythursdayTerese Allen, Author and Food Columnist

Culinary historian Barbara Haber has written that if we really want to understand our past, weve got to follow the food. Thats particularly true in Wisconsin, whose food traditions reflect the richness of an ethnically and agriculturally diverse region. In this presentation, Allen shares the stories behind (and recipes for) such varied foodways as cream puffs, Hmong egg rolls and brandy old fashions. From Friday night fish fry to smashed Yukon Gold potatoes with Hooks blue cheese, she tracks the amazing cornucopia of what Wisconsinites have gathered, grown, produced, cooked and eaten.

 

♦ Gaming: It's Not Just for Teens Anymore!

    Linden/Rosewood

 

Allan M. Kleiman, Library Consultant and Member of ALA's Gaming Experts Panel

Libraries of all types are beginning to see the potential of developing gaming programs that involve adults, families, inter-generational activities and older adults. How is your library responding to this gaming phenomenon? The session will include the basics of developing gaming programs for these specific groups so that you, too, can become "Wii Ready @ Your Library."

 
♦ Innovative Ways in Reaching Adolescents

    Redwood

 

Jan Berg, Director, DeForest Public Library; Maria Hinners, Head of Youth Services, Alice Baker Public Library; Mary Driscoll, Outreach Librarian, Dane County Library Service  

Serving young adults is a privilege we have been given, not a chore we must endure. But, with budget crunches, time, space and other factors working against us, how do we engage and provide them with more services in our libraries and communities? With a little creativity and thinking outside the box, there are ways to have some success.  These innovative services might involve taking the library to them, creating unique partnerships and utilizing more tools on the Web. These presenters will share what they have done in and outside of their libraries to create lasting relationships with young adults that benefits everyone involved!

 

♦ Is Your Story Time Sagging? Prop it Up!

    Lawrence

 

Miriam Thompson, Retired Youth Services Librarian

Are your stories sagging and your tales dragging? Add pizzazz to your programs as you pull surprises from pockets, totes, boxes and bags. Discover how to use props to enhance songs, picture books, folktales and other favorites. Learn tricks of the trade to build your prop collection, including creative recycling, bringing home bargains and cleaning out the closet donations. Tots through tweens will enjoy surprises and storytelling opportunities when you Prop It Up!

 

♦ Motivational Magic Keeping Your Passion in Challenging Times

    McIntosh

 

thursdayMarcy Heim, CFRE, President, The Artful Asker, LLC

Our work brings us much satisfaction. We have chosen to work in the library system because we believe we are making a difference in the worldenriching others through the power of the written word. Yet, our daily routine can serve to drive down that magic.budget cuts, staffing issues, meetings, more meetings, deadlines. We know we have many stakeholders donors, users, other staff all of whom we need to keep engaged. How do we balance the art and science of our days to keep that passion for the work we do? In this session, well look at steps we can implement the day we return home that will help us feel excited about our work and rekindle and re-ignite the passion we want to feel as we go through our days.

♦ Social Software, the Internet and Marketing the Lester Public Library

    Experience

    Pippin

 

Jeff Dawson, Director, Lester Public Library

Jeff began an exploration into social software and Internet marketing in March 2007.  He took an active role in promoting the Lester Public Library via social networking tools available either free or at very low costs.  Join Jeff for tips and inspiration as we look back on a two-year journey, from Flickr to Twitter, which has netted results and recognition for Lester Public Library, Two Rivers, Wisconsin, on local and national levels.

♦ Who Gets The Job and Why

    Crown/Bond

 

Tasha Saecker, Director, Elisha D. Smith Public Library; Kathy Schneider, Director, WiLS; Peter Gilbert, Director, Lawrence University

Attitude. Skill set. Experience and how it benefits the organization. Dynamic resume and interview skills. These factors translate into who gets the job and why. A group of established library leaders will offer helpful hints to job seekers to attain the edge they seek in gaining fulfilling employment.

♦ Writing the Unthinkable

    Evergreen

thursdayLynda Barry Shares Recipes for Writing and Remembering

As described in her latest book, What It Is, Lynda has developed a creative and powerful technique to help people recall and capture their personal memories. Recently, in an ongoing effort to help preserve a rapidly changing culture, she has been showing residents of rural Wisconsin how to vividly recall their stories and collect them as part of a local history archive. She describes it as an opportunity to gather and write stories to add to the collective memory bank in the same way people once came together to have quilting bees.  According to Linda, memories that come from specific, unexpected words have a particular freshness to them and include the kind of detail that is often edited out when people have too long to think about things. Also, for some reason, people writing in groups seem to sustain each other and much gets done in less than ten minutes. Filled with warmth and humor, the writing exercises are more like recipes. They prompt writers to quickly mine their memories for the ordinary things that come alive with meaning once they surface. 

 

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

♦ Exhibits - No Conflict

    Grand Ballroom

 

10:15 a.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)  

     Jeffrey L. Russell   

       Change Basics    

     Terese Allen

       The Flavor of Wisconsin

       The Ovens of Brittany Cookbook

       Cafe Wisconsin Cookbook

 

10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

♦ Are You Ready for an Intellectual Freedom Challenge?  Public Internet

    Services and Community Meeting Rooms

    Evergreen

 

Patricia Laughlin, Director, Hales Corners Public Library; Michael Tyree, Director, West Bend Public Library; Dr. Tomas A. Lipinski, Professor, UW-Milwaukee

These three panelists will talk about their experiences with recent intellectual freedom challenges and provide advice on how other libraries can best prepare in case similar issues occur in their communities.

♦ Changing Environment of Scholarly Communication & Publishing

    Hickory

 

Julie Schneider, Acting Director for the Health Sciences, Ebling Library, UW-Madison

The rapidly changing working environment of scholarly communication has raised as many questions for some as it has provided answers for others. The complexities and variations of open access, public access policies, repositories, print-to-online, increasing costs, decreasing budgets, blogs and social networking sites, indexes and Google, multiple publishing options, copyright concerns, and much more are affecting the environment in which scholars discuss and disseminate their work. Join us as we talk about these issues and how it impacts library services and resources.

 

♦ Coping Strategies for Libraries in Tough Financial Times

    McIntosh

 

Cheryl Becker, Public Library Administration Consultant, South Central Library System; Linda Pierschalla, Director, Oscar Grady Public Library

During times of economic hardship libraries feel the stress of being busier with increased usage from patrons who have discovered the value of the service and resources they can obtain from the library. But just as their business is booming, libraries may be faced with budgets that are not increasing, or even decreasing, as their municipal governments struggle with revenue shortfalls. Cheryl Becker and Linda Pierschalla will offer some tips on coping with the blessings and curses of the economic times we live in, and also lead a roundtable discussion of participants. Come prepared to share your experiences and suggestions for stretching scarce dollars as well as ways of using the economic downturn to your librarys advantage.


♦ Customer Service Practices When Working With Children and Teens

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

Ashley Thiem, Children's Librarian, Appleton Public Library; Paula Wright, Young Adult Librarian, Appleton Public Library
Serving children and teens at the library greatly differs from serving adult populations.  This presentation focuses on the special customer service needs of these diverse populations.  Join us as we discuss brain studies and their correlation to customer service needs, as well as general rules of thumb when working with these populations.  This presentation is beneficial for reference librarians and small libraries that work with a wide range of ages from one desk.  

♦ Drupal in Your Library

    Crown/Bond

Laura Kayacan, Adult Services Librarian, Door County Library; Cheryl Wilson, Door County Library; Mark Beatty, WiLS; Jody Cleveland, Winnefox Library System; Sara Ziemendorf, Senior Information Processing Consultant, UW-Madison Learning Support Services

Whats Drupal?  According to Wikipedia, its a free and open source Content Management System (CMS)  It is used as a back end system for many different types of websites including library Web sites!  During this panel discussion, early adopters from several types of libraries will relate their experiences with Drupal in the words of one, it is not the easiest to use, but we like it.

♦ Library as Community Center: Engaging Local Government Managers as

    Library Partners

    Redwood

thursday

Bette Dillehay, Director, Matthews Memorial Library

The success of a library can be measured by how connected it is to the needs and opportunities within the community. Partnering with local government managers can assist in understanding the community and obtaining resources necessary for success. The advantages to be gained by seeking a close working relationship with local government managers, which can amass to both the library and the community, are examined, as well as tips for achieving such partnerships.

 

♦ Library Services for the Homeless Population in Wisconsin: Findings of a

   Study

   Rosewood

 

Timothy Blomquist, UW-Milwaukee Graduate Student

In April 2008, a survey was conducted to collect information on what kinds of library services/programs are available to the homeless population in our state, as well as other related findings, from the 388 Wisconsin public libraries. Come learn and discuss the results of a thesis called, "A Survey of Wisconsin Public Library Services for the Homeless Population, that were based on the survey findings. Because no one has conducted a survey of this nature before, the results will be a pilot for further investigation or action to those parties interested in using the data.

 

♦ Networking is the Key: An introduction to WLA's Units and Round Tables

    Linden

 

Pamela O'Donnell, Academic Librarian, College Library, UW-Madison; Rhonda Puntney, Youth Services and Special Needs Consultant, Lakeshores Library System; Walter Burkhalter, Director, Mid-Wisconsin Fed Library System; Sheila Stoeckel, Associate Academic Librarian, UW-Madison Memorial Library; Lisa Strand, Executive Director, Wisconsin Library Association 

A group of active WLA members will explain where your interests in librarianship fit into WLA, and how networking within these various groups can advance your career.

 

♦ People of the Sturgeon

    Cortland

 

thursday

Kathleen Schmitt Kline, Science Writer for the Aquatic Sciences Center, UW-Madison

Co-author of People of the Sturgeon: Wisconsin's Love Affair With an Ancient Fish, Kathleen traces the 100-year-history of sturgeon management in Wisconsin's Lake Winnebago region and the unique cultures that surround a very special, ancient fish. She will also share some of the rich photography by the late Bob Rashid that is featured in People of the Sturgeon.

 
♦ Resource Sharing: Past, Present and Future

    Pippin


thursday

Peter Hamon, Former Director of South Central Library System and 2004 WLA-Demco Librarian of the Year
Peter Hamon will come out of retirement just long enough to share his experience and views concerning the past, present and possible future of resource sharing in Wisconsin.  Often known for holding controversial positions, Hamon promises to offer some that he notes "are too new to have even offended anyone yet!" There will be plenty of time for discussion, so come prepared to put in your two cents worth!

 

♦ Teen Services Swap   (handouts available)          

    Lawrence

 

Dawn Wacek, Youth Services Manager, Rice Lake Public Library; Georgia Jones, Youth Services Librarian, C.A. Friday Memorial Library; Leah Langby, Library Development and Youth Services Coordinator, Indianhead Federated Library System; Penny Johnson, Teen Specialist, Baraboo Public Library; Tiffany Wait, Teen Librarian, Milwaukee County Federated Library System
Calling all librarians working with teens and young adults, lets meet together and share ideas. In this informal session, browse tables full of teen programs, activities, grant experiences and more while you talk with the creators behind these fun and successful activities. Better yet, bring your own ideas to swap (and 50 copies of your activity). The Teen Services Swap is your chance to mingle with others in young adult librarianship while you gain some great new ideas for the teens at your library.

 

♦ Trustee Training: Different  Strokes for Different Folks

    Aspen

 

James Backus, WLTF Chair & Former President of Friends of Marathon County Public Library

Panel discussion of Best Practices Study of Library Trustee training methods. WLTF has been conducting a year-long study of methods used nationally to train library trustees. This is a result of the issue raised at the 2008 VISION Conference that library trustees in general, despite good education backgrounds and excellent life skills, have not received specific training as to how to best conduct their responsibilities as a trustee or board member of a library or library system. Our study has already determined that current practices range from No Training Programs (most states) to Mandatory Trustee Certification (Kansas). We intend to present the most practical type of training programs, materials to be used and methods of instruction.

 

11:00 a.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)

    Lynda Barry

      What it is

 

12:15 p.m.

♦ Autograph Garden

    Grand Ballroom (Exhibits)

    Kathleen Schmidt Kline

      People of the Sturgeon:  Wisconsin's Love Affair with an Ancient Fish

 

12:15 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

♦ 2008 VISION Conference WLTF Luncheon and Business Meeting

     Empire

Kathy Pletcher, Associate Provost for Information Services, UW-Green Bay    David A. Cofrin Library

 

2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

♦ ALAs Privacy Initiative: Tools and Resources for Your Library to Get

    Involved

    Redwood

 

thursday

Angela Maycock, Assistant Director, ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom

Join Angela and learn about a new ALA initiative that invites library users into a national conversation about privacy rights in a digital age.  This session will explore how Wisconsin libraries can assist patrons in thinking critically and making informed choices about their information privacy.  Choose PrivacyWeek, a week-long awareness campaign and celebration, will take place May 2-8, 2010, and Angela will showcase some of ALA's ideas and promotional materials.

♦ BadgerLink Magic

    Crown/Bond

 

Lisa Reale, BadgerLink Coordinator, DPI

The BadgerLink program, providing quality information resources to all Wisconsin libraries and citizens, continues to evolve. This session will review recent changes and the latest new features. Bring your questions and comments to this informational session!

 

♦ FRBR and FRAD:  The Foundations of a New Cataloging Code

    Cortland

 

Marjorie E. Bloss, Former RDA Project Manager and Lecturer, Dominican University, GSLIS Program

Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) and Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD) are the building blocks on which the new cataloging code, RDA, Resource Description and Access is built. These conceptual models describe a bibliographic world in which a works relationships to its different physical formats, to translations, adaptations and interpretations, to the people or corporate bodies responsible for them, and to their subjects, interrelate. It is only now that technology has given us the appropriate tools that we can fully realize how to pull together these bibliographic relationships. 

Suggested reading:  What is FRBR by Barbara Tillett.  This publication can be accessed at http://www.loc.gov/cds/downloads/FRBR.PDF and printed at no cost.

 

♦ Getting the Most Out of WLAs Online Community

    Linden

 

Lisa Strand, WLA Executive Director

WLAs new Web site has cool features that allow you to manage your own membership profile, including contact preferences and privacy. Renew and register online and take advantage of flexible payment options. Search the online membership directory, and communicate with others in the library community in new ways. Learn how to post job openings on the bulletin board, comment on topics or create new discussion forums. You can also comment on specific Web pages, take a poll, and find the latest legislative information and alerts with the new CapWiz feature, provided by ALA.

 

♦ Have You Heard About

    Evergreen

 

Tasha Saecker, Director, Elisha D. Smith Public Library; Beth Carpenter, Director, Kimberly-Little Chute Public Library; Stef Morrill, Associate Director, South Central Library System; Joy Schwarz, Web Librarian, Winnefox Library System

Come along as your hosts share recent finds in new technology trends and services, in libraries and beyond. Well highlight easy, free ideas you can take back to your communities. We guarantee there will be something new for everyone!

 

♦ Helping Local Economies Grow!

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

Christine Arkenberg, Coordinator of Business and Technology Reference, Milwaukee Public Library; Julann Jatczak, Vice President/Chief Operating Officer, Wisconsin Womens Business Initiative Corporation (WWBIC)

Libraries, both big and small, can provide invaluable support to entrepreneurs, inventors and business people looking to start and grow small businesses.  Relying on the best free resources available, librarians can actively participate in growing the local economy.  Julann Jatczak will enrich the discussion with practical information about the assistance that they and other agencies throughout the state provide.

 

♦ Partnering Conversations -- What to Say When in Stakeholder

    Relationships

    Lawrence
 

thursdayMarcy Heim, CFRE, President, The Artful Asker, LLC

In our work in libraries we have opportunities to partner with many stakeholders who can help us by serving as volunteers, by providing private support or by helping advocate for resources we need.  We may find ourselves needing to make a cold call to initiate a conversation with someonetough work.  Or, we may want to include perspective stakeholders in our programming.  Perhaps we need to ask for money or time or help in some way.  How do we build these relationships respectfully and artfully?  How do we handle objections? What skills do we need?  And, JUST WHAT do we SAY?  In this session, we will spend some time together having key conversations that you can adapt to your specific needs.
 

♦ Reading Rainbow Young Writers & Illustrators Contest

    McIntosh

 

Lynne Blinkenberg, Director of Community Engagement, Wisconsin Public Television

This annual contest, sponsored by Wisconsin Public Television and Reading Rainbow, is for kindergarteners through 3rd graders, and libraries are a natural partner. Learn how to host a writers and illustrators event in your library, sponsor a local contest or just get tips on helping to spread the word.

 

♦ Resume Review Drop In

    Aspen

This resume review is offered specifically for students looking for their first jobs, but if youre in the hunt for new employment, we encourage you to drop in and get some pointers on how to improve your resume and enhance your chances of landing job interviews.

 

♦ Serving Older Adults: A Step-By-Step Approach

    Pippin

 

Allan M. Kleiman, Library Consultant and Member of ALA's Gaming Experts Panel

"The silver tsunami" is almost here!  How will you and your library respond to this shift in demographics - as an impossible challenge or as a unique opportunity?  This program will provide basic background on the topic as well as focus on how you can build upon current model programs, like "senior spaces," to develop innovative and practical ways to serve the baby boomers, older adults and the elderly, now and in the future-both in your library and in the community.  

 

♦ Student Research Forum

    Hickory

 

Moderator: Tom Walker, Associate Professor, UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies; Student Researchers

The library profession has an excellent opportunity to benefit from new, creative and energetic talent that manifests itself in practice and in research. This session will present up to four research projects by students who reside in or who attend a college or university in Wisconsin. The purpose of this session is to foster significant high-quality research in the profession and to provide a venue for promising future leaders of the profession.

 

♦ Tour of the History Museum at the Castle

Reclaim the Magic in your life by visiting the History Museum in the Castle, just down the street from the Conference hotel. The A.K.A. Houdini exhibit lets you experience some of his tricks of the trade through hands-on activities. It's great fun for the whole family!

 

3:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

♦ Exhibits - No Conflict

    Grand Ballroom

 

 

3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

♦ WLA Foundation Silent Auction - Pickup and Pay

    Briarwood

    

 

4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

 

♦ Beyond Bayonets & Bullets: WPT Vietnam War Stories

    Hickory
 

Lynne Blinkenberg, Director of Community Engagement, Wisconsin Public Television

This session will provide information and resources on using Wisconsin Public Televisions Wisconsin Vietnam War Stories (premiering May 2010) in your library for screenings and discussion with the Reel-to-Real project.  

 

♦ Creating a System for Staff Technology Training and Testing: Experiences

    at the Marathon County Public Library

    McIntosh

 

Garrett Erickson, Support Services Manager, Marathon County Public Library; Betty Tellekson, Personnel Specialist, Marathon County Public Library  

Recognizing that lack of technical skills was making it difficult for some staff to become comfortable and efficient in accomplishing their work, Marathon County Public Library instituted a Technical Skills Competency program. This program will describe the process that MCPL went through to identify the needed skills, ensure that appropriate training was offered to staff and test staff competencies. The program has been very successful in raising staff comfort with both software and hardware.

 

♦ Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla Wisconsin Children's Book Awards

    Lawrence

Leah Langby, Indianhead Federated Library System, and Chair, WLA Children's Book Award Committee; Barbara Huntington, Division for Libraries, Technology & Community Learning; Tom Hurlburt, Rhinelander District Library; Linda Jerome, La Crosse Public Library; Susan Pesheck, River Falls Public Library

The Children's Book Award Committee of the WLA Youth Services Section carefully examined and evaluated nearly 80 titles by authors and illustrators with a Wisconsin connection.  Come and hear them discuss The Graveyard Book  by Neil Gaiman, the 2008 Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla Award winner, and also the books they selected to honor as Outstanding Books.  Be ready for some great book talks!  We'll also talk about the process of selecting the winners and what it was like to be on this award committee.

 

♦ Fantasy Soccer, the 2010 World Cup and Information Literacy

   Crown/Bond      

 

Mark Perkins, Librarian Services Planner, Madison Area Technical College; Nathan Dowd, Librarian Services Planner, Madison Area Technical College; Mark Luetkehoelter, Librarian Instruction Coordinator, Madison Area Technical College

This session will first explore the history of library initiatives to incorporate information literacy into fantasy football leagues. The MATC Librarys Fantasy Football (American rules) Contest, held during the Fall 2009 semester will be briefly reviewed. The emphasis of the session will be on the librarys upcoming Fantasy World Cup Contest to be run in late spring/early summer of 2010. Collaboration on the Fantasy World Cup Contest with MATC sister colleges abroad and other institutions will be explored.

 

♦ Legislatively Speaking

    Linden/Rosewood

 

Rick Grobschmidt, Administrator, Division for Libraries, Technology & Community Learning; Robert Hafeman, Coordinator, Manitowoc-Calumet Library System (WLA Federal Legislative Advocate); Paul Nelson, Adjunct Assistant Professor UW-Madison SLIS (LD&L Chair)

Speakers will provide a step-by-step summary of this years state and federal budget developments, including an overview of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Well also take a look ahead to the legislative priorities for 2010.

 

♦ Making Choices in a Web 2.0 World

    Oaktag/Parchment

 

Beth Carpenter, Director, Kimberly-Little Chute Public Library; Stef Morrill, Associate Director, South Central Library System

All of the Web 2.0 tools available these days provide endless opportunities for projects and services your library could offer. How do you decide what you should and shouldn't use? The presenters will share their ideas about making choices in a Web 2.0 world, along with tips on overcoming barriers to using these tools at your library and how to keep up-to-date without going crazy.

 

♦ Marketing the Library to Enhance Its Role in the Community and Increase

    Its Profit Margin

    Redwood

 

Ronald G. Edwards, Director of Library Services, Western Technical College

Budgets are coming under closer scrutiny and funding is being reduced. In response to this aspect and other accountability measures, I will examine how to develop a marketing plan based on assessing customer needs via a marketing agenda, compile a list of marketing benefits, identify key personnel who will lead these efforts and communicate your librarys identity to its stakeholders.

 

♦ RDA, Resource Description and Access: A Cataloging Code for the 21st

    Century

    Cortland

 

Marjorie E. Bloss, Former RDA Project Manager and Lecturer, Dominican University, GSLIS Program

RDA, Resource Description and Access, takes the ideas found in the conceptual bibliographic models FRBR and FRAD and develops cataloging applications based on them. While RDA is built on many of the principles found in AACR2, it goes beyond AACR2 in its ability to demonstrate a works relationship to its editions, translations, adaptations, as well as to its authors and subjects. Come hear about the plans for this powerful tool and see a demonstration of what it will look like, and how it will assist librarians better serve their library users.

 

♦ The Rural Library Project

     Pippin

 

Dan White, Director of Program Services, The Rural Library Project, Inc.

The Rural Library Project is a nonprofit organization committed to the establishment of new, small libraries in rural areas. We collaborate with citizens, public library systems and governments in these areas to raise funds for and build libraries in their towns. We view these local public libraries as centers of learning, community building and civic pride. The specific goals and services of The Rural Library Project are to: (1) Provide project management services necessary for small, rural communities to establish new library facilities. This includes coordinating the design, coordinating and overseeing the construction and overseeing the equipping of the new library to meet community needs and budgets.  (2) Seek and provide challenge grants for rural communities committed to building new library facilities. These challenge grants are to initiate and assist local public fundraising campaigns to establish new libraries. (3) Seek and provide grants to establish summer reading programs following the construction of new library facilities.

 

♦ Seat at the Community Table = Successful Library Programs

    Evergreen

 

Laurie Magee, Head of Children and Family Outreach Services, Oshkosh Public Library; Jeff Gilderson-Duwe, Director, Oshkosh Public Library and Winnefox Library System; Sue Panek, Director, Oshkosh Area United Way; Kelly K. Zdanovec , Director, Davis Child Care Center; Bridget Cullen, Director, Childcare Resource and Referral

A library is a human service agency on the wellness side and shares a vision and goals with any number of agencies in the community. Earning a seat at the community table may appear to be overwhelming. The Oshkosh Public Library has spent the last quarter century, and perhaps longer, developing partnerships and relationships in the local community that have nurtured a wide variety of library initiatives. This panel of presenters will help you understand the steps and stages of the process from both the community and the library perspective. Creating a strong network of relationships is an investment in the wellbeing of the public library, as a library cannot remain in good health when the community is ailing.

 

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

♦ Midwest ILLiad User Group UW System Meeting

    Hickory

♦ Wisconsin Library Association and Wisconsin Library Association

     Foundation Business Meeting (Agenda)

     Lawrence

 

♦ Wisconsin Small Libraries Round Table Business Meeting

     Redwood

 

7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

♦ Awards Banquet 

    Empire   

They have left their imprints on our libraries.  Please join us for this annual celebration in recognition of those professionals who symbolize the best in librarianship and support of libraries.  Dinner will be followed by presentation of the following awards:  RR Donnelley Award; Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla Award; WLA/Highsmith Library of the Year Award; WLA/DEMCO Librarian of the Year Award; Trustee of the Year Award and Special Service Award.  There will also be acknowledgement of the winners of the Media & Technology Section's Webbies, Outreach Services Round Table Frances de Usabel Award, as well as the Wisconsin Library Heritage Hall of Fame inductees.

Cash bar available.

 

Check out Friday's Schedule